Essentials of Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management:International Edition - Thomas Zimmerer - 9780131579439 - Management - Small Business/Entrepreneurship - Pearson Schweiz AG - Der Fachverlag fuer Bildungsmedien - 978-0-1315-7943-9

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Essentials of Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management:International Edition

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Titel:   Essentials of Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management:International Edition
Reihe:   Prentice Hall
Autor:   Thomas W Zimmerer / Norman M Scarborough / Doug Wilson
Verlag:   Pearson
Einband:   Softcover
Auflage:   5
Sprache:   Englisch
Seiten:   744
Erschienen:   Dezember 2007
ISBN13:   9780131579439
ISBN10:   0-13-157943-6
Status:   Der Titel ist leider nicht mehr lieferbar. Sorry, This title is no longer available. Malheureusement ce titre est épuisé.
 
Ersatztitel:
ISBNTitelAuflageEinbandErscheintVerfügbarPreis
9780273787129 Essentials of Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management , Global Edition 7 Softcover 02.2013
ca. 7-9 Tage
102.40

Essentials of Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management:International Edition

Description

For courses in Small Business Management, Entrepreneurship, New Venture Creation, and New Venture Management.

 

Essentials of Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management, 5/e is the practical, how-to guide that gives students the tools to launch a new venture and the knowledge for entrepreneurial success. 

 


Features

For courses in Small Business Management, Entrepreneurship, New Venture Creation, and New Venture Management.

 

Essentials of Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management, 5/e is the practical, how-to guide that gives students the tools to launch a new venture and the knowledge for entrepreneurial success. 

 

How much do you think successful entrepreneurs rely on theory to start and manage a new business venture? Is Entrepreneurship a course where students can simply read about concepts and understand how they work in the real world?

 

Hands On: How To… features emphasize the practical nature of the book, because Zimmerer/Scarborough/Wilson believe that theory is not enough to launch a new business-you also need the tools and hands-on experience to truly be successful. This feature selects a concept from each chapter and explains how students can put it to practice in their own companies.

  • How To:
    • Transform Your Great Business Idea Into Reality, p. 27
    • Create a Culture of Innovation, p. 67
    • Provide Superior Customer Service, p. 268
    • Calculate Your Company's Pocket Price Band, p. 374

You Be the Consultant features challenge students to reach beyond definitions and theory to apply what they've learned in the chapter. Based on actual companies, each feature poses a problem or opportunity and asks to students to think critically and analytically to answer questions on key issues. These features are ideal for launching lively class discussions, or for short individual or group assignments.

  • Under Armour (Ch. 3) p. 104
  • NetFlix (Ch. 8) p. 298

Eleven Brief Cases, written by co-author Doug Wilson, cover a variety of topics and challenge students to dig in to concepts they are learning about and analyze how they've been used in a real company. Featuring actual small businesses that students can research online, these cases can be used for individual or group assignments and projects.

  • Found at end of text

 

OTHER POINTS OF DISTINCTION

 

 

Is there any assignment you feel is essential for students to successfully complete before leaving your course? What is the best way for students to understand how they can meet the requirements or expectations you have set for an assignment?

 

Emphasis on creating a Business Plan-Many courses in entrepreneurship and small business management require students to write a business plan, as it is the most effective and practical way for students to integrate their ideas with the entrepreneurial concepts they are learning. 

  • Sections 2 and 3: “Building a Business Plan” , Chapters 3-7 & 8-12
  • Section 4: “Putting the Business Plan to Work”, Chapters 13-16

Tight Integration of Business Plan Pro-This best-selling business planning software package from Palo Alto Software is linked directly to the book to serve as a valuable tool in helping students build winning business plans. Written by Doug Wilson, co-author and former employee of Palo Alto Software, every chapter contains an updated Business Plan Pro exercise for students to apply the concepts learned in the chapter to build a successful business plan. A brief user guide is available in the Instructor's Manual.

  • Page 119, 307

Sample Business Plan created by one of the author's former students is included in both the text and on the Companion Website to serve as a model of an exemplary business plan and to guide students as they build their own plans. Students also have access to other sample business plans at Palo Alto's Business Plan Pro Website: www.paloalto.com/bp/samples.cfm.

  • Total Health and Fitness Business Plan, SEE APPENDIX

Does thinking like an entrepreneur come naturally to all students? How do you help your students generate ideas and adopt a more entrepreneurial way of thinking?

 

Chapter 2- Inside the Entrepreneurial Mind: From Ideas to Reality explains the creative process entrepreneurs use to generate business ideas and to recognize opportunities-so that students learn to think like entrepreneurs.

  • Page 41-82

How do you help students understand that potential ideas may not always be successful when translated into an actual business venture?

 

Chapter 4- “Conducting a Feasibility Analysis and Crafting a Winning Business Plan” - Before students can translate an idea into a business plan, it is necessary to first do a feasibility analysis to test the factors that can effect the viability of an idea. Chapter 4 now includes this section on screening entrepreneurs' potential ideas using a feasibility analysis early in the book, before students move on to creating a business plan.

  • Page 123-133

How do ethics impact Entrepreneurship? Do you think failure to recognize this relationship can hurt new ventures?

 

Ethics and Entrepreneurship features give students the opportunity to wrestle with some of the ethical dilemmas entrepreneurs face in the business. These features encourage students to think about and discuss these issues now, so that they are better prepared to make the right decisions in the future.  

  • Page 566, 603

How do you keep your students informed of the latest events and topics in Entrepreneurship?

 

Real-world examples integrated throughout allow students to see how entrepreneurs in today's business world put the concepts taught in the book into practice. Set off in italics with in-margin markers, these prominent examples help students remember key concepts in the course by relating the material to actual business examples.

  • Page MusicStack, p. 22; Snocap, p. 8; Callaway Golf, p.76; Google, p. 177; Chicos, p. 287; Build-A-Bear, p. 288

Chapter 9: “E-Commerce and the Entrepreneur” - In today's technologically driven world, an entrepreneur must have a certain level of computer fluency to manage a business. This chapter serves as a guide to using the Web to conduct business in the twenty-first century.

  • Page 310-354

 

This text is available for personalization in the PHCBR custom database program.  Select only the chapters you require or supplement with recommended case studies all under one cover.  CLICK HERE to go directly to the PHCBR book-build site or visit our product page for additional information at pearsoncustom.com/business.

 

 

 

Zum Seitenanfang

New to this Edition

How much do you think successful entrepreneurs rely on theory to start and manage a new business venture? Is Entrepreneurship a course where students can simply read about concepts and understand how they work in the real world?

 

Hands On: How To…  This newfeature emphasizes the practical nature of the book, because Zimmerer/Scarborough/Wilson believe that theory is not enough to launch a new business-you also need the tools and hands-on experience to truly be successful. This feature selects a concept from each chapter and explains how students can put it to practice in their own companies.

  • How To:
    • Transform Your Great Business Idea Into Reality, p. 27
    • Create a Culture of Innovation, p. 67
    • Provide Superior Customer Service, p. 268
    • Calculate Your Company's Pocket Price Band, p. 374-5

You Be the Consultant-These popular segments, which are new and updated for the 5th edition, challenge students to reach beyond definitions and theory to apply what they've learned in the chapter. Based on actual companies, each feature poses a problem or opportunity and asks to students to think critically and analytically to answer questions on key issues. These features are ideal for launching lively class discussions, or for short individual or group assignments.

  • Under Armour (Ch. 3) p. 104
  • NetFlix (Ch. 8) p. 298

New: Eleven Brief Cases, written by co-author Doug Wilson, cover a variety of topics and challenge students to dig in to concepts they are learning about and analyze how they've been used in a real company. Featuring actual small businesses that students can research online, these cases can be used for individual or group assignments and projects.

  • Found at end of text

New: 4-Color Design-- The look of the text has been redesigned in 4-color to intrigue students and bring the concepts to life.


Is there any assignment you feel is essential for students to successfully complete before leaving your course? What is the best way for students to understand how they can meet the requirements or expectations you have set for an assignment?

 

Continued emphasis on creating a Business Plan-Many courses in entrepreneurship and small business management require students to write a business plan, because it is the most effective and practical way for students to integrate their ideas with the entrepreneurial concepts they are learning. 

  • Sections 2 and 3: “Building a Business Plan” Chapters 3-7 & 8-12
  • Section 4: “Putting the Business Plan to Work” Chapters 13-16

Tighter integration of Business Plan Pro-This best-selling business planning software package from Palo Alto Software is linked directly to the book to serve as a valuable tool in helping students build winning business plans. Written by Doug Wilson, co-author and former employee of Palo Alto Software, every chapter contains an updated Business Plan Pro exercise for students to apply the concepts learned in the chapter to build a successful business plan. A brief user guide is available in the Instructor's Manual.

  • See page 119, 307

New Sample Business Plan created by one of the author's former students is included in both the text and on the Companion Website to serve as a model of an exemplary business plan and to guide students as they build their own plans. Students also have access to other sample business plans at Palo Alto's Business Plan Pro Website: www.paloalto.com/bp/samples.cfm.

  • Total Health and Fitness Business Plan, SEE APPENDIX

How do you help students understand that potential ideas may not always be successful when translated into an actual business venture?

 

New Chapter 4- “Conducting a Feasibility Analysis and Crafting a Winning Business Plan” - Before students can translate an idea into a business plan, it is necessary to first do a feasibility analysis to analyze the factors that can effect the viability of an idea. Based on reviewer feedback, Chapter 4 now includes this section on screening entrepreneurs' potential ideas using a feasibility analysis early in the book, before students move on to creating a business plan.

  • Page p. 123-133

How do ethics impact Entrepreneurship? Do your students understand this relationship?

 

New Ethics and Entrepreneurship features give students the opportunity to wrestle with some of the ethical dilemmas entrepreneurs face in the business. These features encourage students to think about and discuss these issues now, so that they are better prepared to make the right decisions in the future.  

  • Page 566, 603

How do you keep your students informed of the latest events and topics in Entrepreneurship?

 

Updated real-world examples integrated throughout allow students to see how entrepreneurs in today's business world put the concepts taught in the book into practice. Set off in italics with in-margin markers, these prominent examples help students remember key concepts in the course by relating the material to actual business examples.

  • MusicStack, p. 22; Snocap, p. 8; Callaway Golf, p. 76; Google, p. 177; Chicos, p. 287; Build-A-Bear, p. 288 

New Chapter 9: “E-Commerce and the Entrepreneur” - In today's technologically driven world, an entrepreneur must have a certain level of computer fluency to manage a business. This chapter serves as a guide to using the Web to conduct business in the twenty-first century.

  • Page 310-354

New separate chapters on “Organizational Issues: Forms of Ownership” and “Franchising the Entrepreneur”-Previously covered in one chapter, these topics have been separated to offer more teaching flexibility.

  • See Chapters 5 and 6
Zum Seitenanfang

Table of Contents

Section I.  The Challenge of Entrepreneurship 

1.   The Foundations of Entrepreneurship

2.   Inside the Entrepreneurial Mind: From Ideas to Reality

 

Section II.  Building the Business Plan: Beginning Considerations

3.   Designing a Competitive Business Model and Building a Solid Strategic Plan

4.   Conducting a Feasibility Analysis and Crafting a Winning Business Plan

5.   Forms of Business Ownership

6.   Franchising and the Entrepreneur

7.   Buying an Existing Business 

 

Section III.  Building the Business Plan: Marketing and Financial Considerations

8.   Building a Powerful Marketing Plan

9.   E-Commerce and the Entrepreneur                                                                

10.       Pricing Strategies

11.       Creating a Successful Financial Plan 

12.       Managing Cash Flow

 

Section IV.  Putting the Business Plan to Work: Sources of Funds

13.       Sources of Financing: Debt and Equity

14.       Choosing the Right Location

15.       Global Aspects of Entrepreneurship

16.       Building a New Venture Team and Planning for the Next Generation

 

Appendix: Sample Business Plan

 

Brief Cases

 

End Notes

 

Index

 

 

Zum Seitenanfang