Art

Series
Pearson
Author
Marilyn Stokstad / Michael W. Cothren  
Publisher
Pearson
Cover
Softcover
Edition
6
Language
English
Total pages
640
Pub.-date
January 2015
ISBN13
9780133843750
ISBN
0133843750
Related Titles



Description

For Art History Survey courses

The most student-friendly, contextual, and inclusive art history survey text on the market
Now in its sixth edition, Art: A Brief History continues to balance formal analysis with contextual art history in order to engage a diverse student audience. Authors Marilyn Stokstad and Michael Cothren, both scholars as well as teachers, share a common vision that survey courses should be filled with as much enjoyment as learning, and that they should foster an enthusiastic, as well as an educated, public for the visual arts. By treating the visual arts as one component of a vibrant cultural landscape (which also includes politics, religion, economics, and more), Art: A Brief History helps students recognize and appreciate the central role that art and architecture have played in human history.

Also available with MyArtsLab®
MyArtsLab for the Art History Survey course extends learning online, engaging students and improving results. Media resources with assignments bring concepts to life, and offer students opportunities to practice applying what they’ve learned. And the Writing Space helps educators develop and assess concept mastery and critical thinking through writing, quickly and easily. Please note: this version of MyArtsLab does not include an eText.

Art: A Brief History, Sixth Edition is also available via REVEL™, an immersive learning experience designed for the way today's students read, think, and learn. Learn more.

Features

A student-focused structure encourages critical thinking and aids comprehension
NEW! A revised and expanded learning architecture better guides students through course material.
• As in the previous edition, each chapter opens with a Learn About It feature that indicates key learning objectives.
• A corresponding set of Think About It questions at the end of the chapter helps students think through and apply what they’ve learned.
• New to the sixth edition, the A-heads in the running text correspond to both the learning objectives (Learn About It) and the assessment questions (Think About It). This organization keeps students on task as they proceed through each chapter, and reinforces the critical thinking, creative inquiry, and disciplined reasoning that stand behind art historical interpretation.• Crosscurrent Questions at the end of each chapter encourage students to compare works from different chapters and probe the relationship of recurrent themes across cultures, times, and places.
Engaging features foster enthusiasm for, and understanding of, works of art
NEW! Because they relish sharing the new discoveries and fresh interpretive perspectives that are constantly enriching the history of art, the authors have incorporated new scholarship and new images where appropriate throughout the sixth edition. Examples of new and update content include:
• A newly excavated example of a Han tomb model;
• A more accurate reconstruction of the Akropolis; and
• Raphael’s newly restored Madonna of the Goldfinch in a discussion of his earlier devotional paintings.• Closer Look boxes in each chapter guide students as they explore particular works of art, helping them understand issues of usage, iconography, and style.

Broader Look boxes in each chapter offer an in-depth contextual treatment of a single work of art.

Elements of Architecture boxes clarify architectural features, often explaining engineering principles or building technology.

Technique boxes outline the techniques and processes by which certain types of art are created.

Recovering the Past boxes highlight the work of archaeologists and conservators who assure the preservation and clear presentation of art.

Chapter-opening maps list all the places mentioned in the chapter, enabling students to visualize relevant geographic relationships.

Also available with MyArtsLab®
MyArtsLab for the Art History Survey course extends learning online, engaging students and improving results. Media resources with assignments bring concepts to life, and offer students opportunities to practice applying what they’ve learned. And the Writing Space helps educators develop and assess concept mastery and critical thinking through writing, quickly and easily. Please note: this version of MyArtsLab does not include an eText.
NEW! Writing Space provides everything you need to foster better writing, all in one place. It's a single place to create, track, and grade writing assignments, provide writing resources, and exchange meaningful, personalized feedback with students, quickly and easily. And thanks to integration with Turnitin®, Writing Space can check students’ work for improper citation or plagiarism.

Closer Looks provide in-depth walk-throughs of key works of art. This feature models how an art historian talks about a work of art and enables students to zoom in on details they might not otherwise see – even in person! Closer Looks provide engaging facts and include expert audio to help with pronunciations.

• 360-degree Architectural Panoramas takes line drawings of major monuments in the book, and deep links them to exciting, detailed panoramas. In seconds, students are transported to the Parthenon, the Pantheon, or a cathedral in France – and immediately gain a sense of space and place.

Art21 videos provide students with up close looks at contemporary artists at work, helping students better understand a variety of media and techniques.
Art: A Brief History, Sixth Edition is also available via REVEL™, an immersive learning experience designed for the way today's students read, think, and learn. Learn more.

New to this Edition

Art: A Brief History, Sixth Edition is also available via REVEL™, an immersive learning experience designed for the way today's students read, think, and learn. Learn more.


I. New and Updated Features

A student-focused structure encourages critical thinking and aids comprehension
A revised and expanded learning architecture better guides students through course material.
• As in the previous edition, each chapter opens with a Learn About It feature that indicates key learning objectives.
• A corresponding set of Think About It questions at the end of the chapter helps students think through and apply what they’ve learned.
• New to the sixth edition, the A-heads in the running text correspond to both the learning objectives (Learn About It) and the assessment questions (Think About It). This organization keeps students on task as they proceed through each chapter, and reinforces the critical thinking, creative inquiry, and disciplined reasoning that stand behind art historical interpretation.
Engaging features foster enthusiasm for, and understanding of, works of art

• Because they relish sharing the new discoveries and fresh interpretive perspectives that are constantly enriching the history of art, the authors have incorporated new scholarship and new images where appropriate throughout the sixth edition. Examples of new and update content include:
• A newly excavated example of a Han tomb model;
• A more accurate reconstruction of the Akropolis; and
• Raphael’s newly restored Madonna of the Goldfinch in a discussion of his earlier devotional paintings.
Also available with MyArtsLab®

MyArtsLab for the Art History Survey course extends learning online, engaging students and improving results. Media resources with assignments bring concepts to life, and offer students opportunities to practice applying what they’ve learned. And the Writing Space helps educators develop and assess concept mastery and critical thinking through writing, quickly and easily. Please note: this version of MyArtsLab does not include an eText.
Writing Space provides everything you need to foster better writing, all in one place. It's a single place to create, track, and grade writing assignments, provide writing resources, and exchange meaningful, personalized feedback with students, quickly and easily. And thanks to integration with Turnitin®, Writing Space can check students’ work for improper citation or plagiarism.
II. Content Updates

Introduction
• New images of flowers – a photograph of Two Callas by Imogen Cunningham and Jack-in-the-Pulpit painted by Georgia O’Keeffe – enrich the discussion of representational modes and present a productive opportunity for comparative analysis.

1. Prehistoric Art in Europe
• A new ground-level view of Stonehenge is coordinated with a better diagram of the whole site to clarify the presentation of this critical monument.

2. Art of the Ancient Near East
• The carved vessel from Warka is now illustrated with a double view showing two sides to enhance an understanding of the unfolding of the narrative, which is more fully explored in the text.
• A new Closer Look explores both sides of the Standard of Ur.

3. Art of Ancient Egypt
• A better image has been substituted for the Great Pyramids, and leader-line captions have been added to the reconstruction drawing.

4. Early Asian Art
• Better images were obtained to illustrate the lion capital of Ashokan pillar, the Gandhara Shakyamuni Buddha, the Mathura Buddha and attendants, Borobodur, Nanchan Temple, and the Great Wild Goose Pagoda.
• A more complex newly excavated example has been used to discuss Han tomb models.

5. Art of Ancient Greece and the Aegean World
• Better images were obtained to illustrate the Riace Warriors, the Parthenon, and the Spear Bearer (Doryphoros).
• The discussion of Mycenaen dagger blades centers on a new, more representative example.
• Two critical reconstructions have been redrawn for greater clarity: the design scheme of a Cycladic figure, and a more accurate reconstruction of the Akropolis.
• Leader-line captions enrich the reconstruction drawings of Knossos and Mycenae.
• A new discussion of the temple from Aegina integrates the pediment sculpture with its architectural context.

6. Etruscan and Roman Art
• Several new and improved drawings have been substituted for the reconstructions of an Etruscan temple and the Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine.
• A new figure of a detail has been added to the discussion of the Column of Trajan, and the Venice Tetrarchs now represent tetrarchic sculpture.
• The plan and reconstruction of the generic Roman house has been replaced with a plan of the House of the Vetii at Pompeii to create an integrated discussion of that house, including its architectural design as well as its wall paintings.

7. Jewish, Early Christian, and Byzantine Art
• Leader-line captions clarify the isometric drawing of Hagia Sophia.
• A plan has been added of the Hosios Lukas monastery complex, allowing an expanded discussion of the organization of monasteries within the text.
• Improved images illustrate the narthex mosaics of the Constantinopolitan monastic church of Christ in Chora.

8. Islamic Art
• The presentation of the monuments and works has ben reorganized to clarify chronological relationships in the development of Islamic art.
• Better images illustrate the Dome of the Rock.
• To enrich the discussion of luxury arts, Bihzad’s “Yusuf Fleeing Zulayhka” has been substituted for his “Turkish Bath.”
• Sultan Muhammad’s spectacular “Court of Gayumars,” considered in its time as the greatest painting of the Persian narrative tradition, has been added.

9. Later Asian Art
• The chapter now features a woodblock print by Sharaku.

10. Early Medieval and Romanesque Art
• The Art and Its Contexts box on Hildegard of Bingen now includes an illustration of one of her visions as well as her author portrait.
• Better images have been found for the figures of the Moissac portal and the Bayeux Embroidery.

11. Gothic Art
• The interior of the abbey church of Saint-Denis, the Chartres Cathedral Royal Portal jamb statues, and the interior of the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris are captured better in a series of new images.

12. Early Renaissance Art
• A better image for the recently restored figure of Donatello’s David has been added.
• Giovanni Bellini’s St. Francis in Ecstasy has been added to incorporate Venice into the discussion of the early Italian Renaissance.

13. Art of the High Renaissance and Reformation
• This chapter has a new opening focusing on Leonardo’s Mona Lisa.
• Better images appear for the figures of Michelangelo’s Vatican Pietà and Titan’s Pastoral Concert.
• Raphael’s newly restored Madonna of the Goldfinch has been used to discuss his early devotional paintings.

14. Seventeenth-Century Art in Europe
• A new Closer Look focuses on Rubens and Snyders’s Prometheus Bound.
• A painting of the Immaculate Conception by Murillo has been added to coordinate with the newly included painting of the Virgin of Guadalupe in Chapter 17.

15. Art of the Americas
• Better images have been obtained for El Castillo and the chacmool at Chichén Itzá.
• A reconstruction drawing has been added to the presentation of the Templo Mayor.
• A new Closer Look focuses on the Maya relief of Shield Jaguar and Lady Xok.
• The chapter now includes a discussion of a Mimbres painted bowl.

17. European and American Art, 1715—1840
• Fragonard’s The Swing, Sebastian Salcedo’s Virgin of Guadalupe, and Friedrich’s Abbey in an Oak Forest have been added to this chapter.

18. European and American Art, 1840—1910
The Life Line now represents the work of Winslow Homer.
• A re-written Art and Its Contexts box on “Japonisme” highlights prints by Suzuki Harunobu and Mary Cassatt.

19. Modern Art in Europe and the Americas, 1900—1945

• A glorious new color photograph captures Mary Colter’s Lookout Studio at the Grand Canyon.

20. Art since 1945
• A new Art and Its Contexts box on “Controversies over Public Funding of the Arts” includes an illustration of Chris Ofili’s The Holy Virgin Mary.
• A new painting is used in the discussion of Mark Rothko, and Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Horn Players has been added to the chapter.

Table of Contents

1. Prehistoric Art in Europe
2. Art of the Ancient Near East
3. Art of Ancient Egypt
4. Early Asian Art
5. Art of Ancient Greece and the Aegean World
6. Etruscan and Roman Art
7. Jewish, Early Christian, and Byzantine Art
8. Islamic Art
9. Later Asian Art
10. Early Medieval and Romanesque Art
11. Gothic Art
12. Early Renaissance Art
13. Art of the High Renaissance and Reformation
14. Seventeenth-Century Art in Europe
15. Art of the Americas
16. African Art
17. European and American Art, 1715—1840
18. European and American Art, 1840—1910
19. Modern Art in Europe and The Americas, 1900—1945
20. Art Since 1945

Author

Marilyn Stokstad, teacher, art historian, and museum curator, has been a leader in her field for decades and has served as president of the College Art Association and the International Center of Medieval Art. In 2002, she was awarded the lifetime achievement award from the National Women’s Caucus for Art. In 1997, she was awarded the Governor’s Arts Award as Kansas Art Educator of the Year and an honorary degree of doctor of humane letters by Carleton College. She is Judith Harris Murphy Distinguished Professor Emerita at the University of Kansas, Lawrence. She has also served in various leadership capacities at the University’s Spencer Museum of Art and is Consultative Curator of Medieval Art at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri

Michael W. Cothren is Professor of Art History at Swarthmore College, where he has also served as Art Department Chair, Coordinator of Medieval Studies, and Divisional Chair of the Humanities. Since arriving at Swarthmore in 1978, he has taught specialized courses on Medieval, Roman, and Islamic art and architecture, as well as seminars on theory and method, but he most enjoys teaching the survey to Swarthmore beginners. His research and publications focus on French Gothic art and architecture, most recently in a book on the stained glass of Beauvais Cathedral entitled Picturing the Celestial City. Michael is consultative curator of medieval stained glass at the Glencairn Museum in Bryn Athyn, Pennsylvania. He has served on the board of the International Center of Medieval Art and as President both of the American Committee of the International Corpus Vitrearum and of his local school board. When not teaching or engaged in art historical research, you can find him hiking in the red rocks around Sedona, Arizona.