Photography

Series
Pearson
Author
Mary Warner Marien  
Publisher
Pearson
Cover
Softcover
Edition
4
Language
English
Total pages
560
Pub.-date
December 2013
ISBN13
9780205988945
ISBN
0205988946
Related Titles



Description

A richer, more kaleidoscopic account of the history of photography

 

Incorporating the latest research and international uses of photography, Photography: A Cultural History, 4/e surveys the history of photography in such a way that students can gauge the medium's multifold developments and see the historical and cultural contexts in which photographers lived and worked. Mary Marien’s comprehensive survey shows how photography has sharpened, if not altered forever, our perception of the world. It provides a unique focus on contemporary photo-based work and electronic media.

 

The book was written to introduce students to photography, requiring no previous technical knowledge of photography. The fourth edition has been revised to include new material and to expand topics that have received recent scholarly and public attention. Material on the history of photography in China, ranging from the nineteenth century to the present, has been added throughout the new edition. For the first time, adopting instructors may receive access to a PowerPoint set containing many images from the book.  

 

To learn more about pricing options and customization, click the Choices tab.

Features

  • Examines Topics in More Detail - Focus boxes highlight interesting cultural or controversial issues. Some examples are "Photography and Futurism" and "Lewis Carroll's Photographs of Children," and a look at "China." A new Focus box on European worker photography, a long-neglected area of study, as been added.  Portrait boxes feature certain photographers in greater detail such as Edward Burtynsky, Wendy Ewald, Bill Henson, Zwelethu Mthethwa, and Thomas Struth. A new box on the Conceptual artists, Ed Ruscha has been added.  
  • Identifies Philosophy’s Connection to Photography - Chapter-ending Philosophy and Practice sections center on how beliefs shape photographic practice. This feature offers students critical reflections on the period just discussed broadening their thoughts on how and why photographs are created.
  • Integrates a Cultural Context - The emphasis is more on key ideas than individuals. Students will follow debates such as the nature of invention, the effect of mass media on morality, the use of imagery as a tool of Western colonialism, and the role of the photography in advertising, fashion, radical politics, and family life. Also this title pays loose attention to how contemporary practitioners, commentators, and beholders have talked about specific works, the nature of photography, and the photographer's changing role in society.
  • Features Groundbreaking, International Survey -  In addition to representing the canon of Europe and the United States, the book benefits from over two decades of new research into non-Western photography and yields rarely seen work from Latin America, Africa, India, Russia, China, and Japan.
  • Organizes Broad Topics Chronologically - Each of the eight chapters takes a period of up to forty years and examines the medium through the lenses of art, science, fashion, the mass media, and individual practitioners. Photographic history is presented in the context of actual historical events such as the American Civil War, and in cultural settings, like the sense of alienation that infiltrated post-World War II Europe and America. This title details political and economic events that shaped the circumstances in which photography was practiced, and pays special attention to the particular ideas generated by and about photography in each period.

New to this Edition

  • Chapter 9 contains a new 'focus' box on Worker Photography in Europe
  • Chapter 11 has a new sub-section on 'Photography and Conceptual Art' and a new 'portrait' box on Ed Ruscha.
  • The discussion on Conceptualism has been enlarged to show its importance to both Postmodern thought and contemporary photography.
  • Some existing images have been replaced with an updated image of the same photo to improve the quality of some of the more historical photographs. New
  • New images have been added:
    •  William Henry Fox Talbot, Leaf, c. 1840. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.
    • Anna Atkins, Cover of Cyanotypes of British and Foreign Ferns, 1854. Cyanotype. The National Media Museum, Bradford, UK.
    • Giacomo Caneva, Vatican Museum, view of interior, 1847–1852. Salted paper print. Biblioteca Panizzi, Reggio Emilia.
    • Andre Eugene Disderi, Prince Lobkowitz, 1858. The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Gift, through Joyce and Robert Menschel.
    • Gabriel Harrison, Past, Present, Future, 1854. George Eastman House, International Museum of Photography.
    • Lady Filmer, Untitled leaf from the Filmer Album, c. 1865. Photo and water color. Photo and Paul F. Walter Collection, NY
    • Jean-Charles Langlois, Léon-Eugène Méhédin, Frédéric Martens, Ruins at Sebastopol, 1855. Musée d'Orsay, Paris.
    • George N. Barnard, City of Atlanta No. 1, 1866. Albumen print. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
    • Bruno Braquehais, The Fall of the Vendôme Column, 1871. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.
    • Liang Shitai (See Tay), Seventh Prince Feeding Deer, 1888. Albumen Print. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C
    • Claude-Joseph-Desire Charnay, The Prison, Chichen-Itza, 1857–89. Albumen silver print from glass negative. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
    • William Henry Jackson, Old Faithful, Wyoming, 1870. Albumen silver print. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, California
    • W.H. Illingsworth, Columns of cavalry, artillery, and wagons, commanded by General George A. Custer, crossing the plains of Dakota Territory during the 1874 Black Hills expedition, 1874. Paper print.
    • Photographer Unknown, A Bear Trainer, exhibited in the Western and Slav section of the Moscow Ethnographic Exhibition, 1867. Paper print. Royal Anthropological Institute, London.
    • Marie Bonfils, Group of Bedouin Women. 1876-1885. University of Pennsylvania Museum
    • Chales Marville, 14 Rue des Marmousets (destroyed): View from the East. At left, Rue de Glatigny (destroyed, replaced by the hotel-Dieu), n.d. Paper print. Biblotheque Historique de la Ville de Paris.
    • Suzanne Porcher, Among the Irises, Public Gardens of Tours, France. 1924. Autochrome.
    • Edward Steichen, Flatiron, 1904. Blue-tinted gum bichromate film over a platinum print. The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
    • August Strindberg, Celestograph XII, 1893-94. Royal Library, Stockholm.
    • Thomas Eakins, Motion Study: George Reynolds nude, pole-vaulting, 1885. Gelatin silver print. Philadelphia Museum of Art.
    • Eduard Valenta & Josef Maria Eder, Frogs, 1896, from the portfolio Versuche über photographie mittlest der Röntgenschen Strahlen. X-ray. George Eastman House, Rochester, New York.
    • Stephen F. Sprague, Yoruba triplets from Yoruba Photography: How the Yoruba See Themselves, 1978. Photograph by Simple Photo, Courtesy The MIT Press.
    • Mario Giacomelli, Roma, 1957
    • Barrie Wentzell, Elton John, Sundown Theatre, Edmonton, London, 1973
    • Naoyoshi Hikosaka, Revolution, 1971. Offset printed postcard and silk screen. Getty Research Institute, Research Library.
    • Mark McLoughlin, Stolen Souls, Willing, (Pam), 2010.
    • Carlos Somonte, Lyle Ashton Harris with cotton candy, Rockport County Fair, Maine, U.S.A., 1986.
    • Tokihiro Sato, Photo-Respiration (Breath-graph no.22), 1988
    • Chun-Shan (Sandie) Yi, Animal Instinct, 2005. Photo: Cheng-Chang Kuo.
    • Youssef Nabil, Sweet Temptation, Cairo, 1993. Hand coloured gelatin silver print.
    • Lalla Essaydi, Les Femmes du Maroc: Grande Odalisque. 2008 Chromogenic Print.
    • James Zeng-Huan, Family Planning Project: Dr Jiang's Rural Clinic, 1997
    • Ryan McGinley, Dakota (Hair), 2004
    • Walead Beshty, Three Color Curl, 2010. CMY/Five Magnet: Irvine, California, January 2nd 2010, Fujicolor Crystal Archive Super Type, color photographic paper. Photo: Brian Forrest
    • Doug Rickard, #39.177833, Baltimore, MD (2008), 2011.

 

Table of Contents

In This Section:

 I) Brief Table of Contents

 II) Detailed Table of Contents

 

I) Brief Table of Contents

 

PART ONE: PHOTOGRAPHY’S DOUBLE INVENTION

Chapter 1. The Origins of Photography (to 1839)

Chapter 2. The Second Invention of Photography (1839– 1854)

 

PART TWO: THE EXPANDING DOMAIN (1854–1880)

Chapter 3.  Popular Photography and the Aims of Art

Chapter 4. Imaging of the Social World

Chapter 5. Science and Social Science

 

PART THREE: PHOTOGRAPHY AND MODERNITY (1880–1918)

Chapter 6. The Great Divide

Chapter 7. Modern Life

 

PART FOUR: A NEW VISION (1918–1945)

Chapter 8.Art and the Age of Mass Media

Chapter 9. Documentary Expression and Popular Photography

 

PART FIVE: THROUGH THE LENS OF CULTURE (1945–1975)

Chapter 10. The Human Family

Chapter 11. The Cold War Era

 

PART SIX: CONVERGENCES (1975 TO THE PRESENT)

Chapter 12. Globalism, Technology, and Social Change

Chapter 13. The Culture of Critique

Chapter 14. Into the Twenty-First Century

 

  

II) Detailed Table of Contents

 

PART ONE: PHOTOGRAPHY’S DOUBLE INVENTION

Chapter 1. The Origins of Photography (to 1839)

Before Photography

The Invention of “Photographies”

Responses to the Announcement of the Daguerreotype

The Politics of Invention

 

Chapter 2. The Second Invention of Photography (1839– 1854)

The Second Invention

Photography and the Sciences

Recording Events with the Camera

War and Photography

Expeditionary and Travel Photography

Portraiture and the Camera

Photography and Fiction

 

PART TWO: THE EXPANDING DOMAIN (1854–1880)

Chapter 3.  Popular Photography and the Aims of Art

Photographic Societies, Publications, and Exchange Clubs 79

The Stereograph

The Carte-de-Visite

Art and Photography

Photography as a Fine Art

Women Behind the Camera

 

Chapter 4. Imaging of the Social World

War and Photography

Later Conflicts

Topographical Surveys and Photography

 

Chapter 5. Science and Social Science

Photography and the Social Sciences 143

Photography in Medicine and Science 154

 

PART THREE: PHOTOGRAPHY AND MODERNITY (1880–1918)

Chapter 6. The Great Divide

Mass Media and Mass Markets 165

The Challenge for Art Photography

Pictorialism

 

Chapter 7. Modern Life

The Modern City

Science and Photography

Photography, Social Science, and Exploration

War and Revolution

 

PART FOUR: A NEW VISION (1918–1945)

Chapter 8.Art and the Age of Mass Media

Photojournalism

Revolutionary Art: The Soviet Photograph

Dada and After

Surrealist Photography

Experimental Photography and Advertising

California Modern

 

Chapter 9. Documentary Expression and Popular Photography

The Origins of Documentary

Popular Science/Popular Art

World War II

War and Photography

 

PART FIVE: THROUGH THE LENS OF CULTURE (1945–1975)

Chapter 10. The Human Family

The Family of Man

Cultural Relativism and Cultural Resistance

Photographing the Atomic Bomb

 

Chapter 11. The Cold War Era

Annihilation, Alienation, Abstraction: America

Technology and Media in Postwar America

Photography in Art

The Czar’s Pantheon

 

PART SIX: CONVERGENCES (1975 TO THE PRESENT)

Chapter 12. Globalism, Technology, and Social Change

Photography and the Global Experience

Photography, Nature, and Science

Post-Photography

The Predicaments of Social Concern

Neutral Vision

The Look of Politics

 

Chapter 13. The Culture of Critique

The New Social Documentary

The Postmodern Era

Family Pictures

Nature and the Body Politic

Enter Fashion

The Passing of Postmodernism

 

Chapter 14. Into the Twenty-First Century

War and Photography

The Past in the Present

The Medium of the Moment

Science and Society

Pre-Production/Post-Production

Screens and Platforms

Epilogue

 

Author

Mary Warner Marien is a professor in the Department of Fine Arts at Syracuse University New York where she teaches courses on photographic history as well as on art criticism and its history. In 2008 she won an Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writer award for her continuing work on the history and theory of documentary photography and is the author of 'Photography and its Critics' (Cambridge University Press, 1997) as well as numerous articles on the history of photography.