Human-Computer Interaction

Series
Prentice Hall
Author
Alan Dix / Janet E. Finlay / Gregory D. Abowd / Russell Beale  
Publisher
Pearson
Cover
Softcover
Edition
3
Language
English
Total pages
864
Pub.-date
September 2003
ISBN13
9780130461094
ISBN
0130461091
Related Titles



Description

Much has changed since the first edition of human–computer interaction was published. Ubiquitous computing and rich sensor-filled environments are finding their way out of the laboratory, not just into movies but also into our workplaces and homes. The computer has broken out of its plastic and glass bounds providing us with networked societies where personal computing devices from mobile phones to smart cards fill our pockets and electronic devices surround us at home and work. The web too has grown from a largely academic network into the hub of business and everyday lives. As the distinctions between the physical and the digital, and between work and leisure start to break down, human-computer interaction is also changing radically. The excitement of these changes is captured in this new edition, which also looks forward to other emerging technologies. However, the book is firmly rooted in strong principles and models independent of the passing technologies of the day: these foundations will be the means by which today’s students will understand tomorrow’s technology.The third edition of human–computer interaction can be used for introductory and advanced courses on HCI, Interaction Design, Usability or Interactive Systems Design. It will also prove an invaluable reference for professionals wishing to design usable computing devices. Accompanying the text is a comprehensive website containing a broad range of material for instructors, students and practitioners, a full text search facility for the book, links to many sites of additional interest and much more: go to www.hcibook.com

New to this Edition

  • A revised structure, reflecting the growth of HCI as a discipline, separates out basic material suitable for introductory courses from more detailed models and theories.
  • New chapter on Interaction Design adds material on scenarios and basic navigation design.
  • New chapter on Universal Design, substantially extending the coverage of this material in the book.
  • Updated and extended treatment of socio/contextual issues.
  • Extended and new material on novel interaction, including updated ubicomp material, designing experience, physical sensors and a new chapter on rich interaction.
  • Updated material on the web including dynamic content and WAP.

Table of Contents

Contents
Foreword
Preface to the third edition

Preface to the second edition

Preface to the first edition

Introduction

Part 1 Foundations

Chapter 1 The human

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Input–output channels

Design Focus: Getting noticed

Design Focus: Where’s the middle?

1.3 Human memory

Design Focus: Cashing in

Design Focus: 7 ± 2 revisited

1.4 Thinking: reasoning and problem solving

Design Focus: Human error and false memories

1.5 Emotion

1.6 Individual differences

1.7 Psychology and the design of interactive systems

1.8 Summary

Exercises

Recommended reading

Chapter 2 The computer

2.1 Introduction

Design Focus: Numeric keypads

2.2 Text entry devices

2.3 Positioning, pointing and drawing

2.4 Display devices

Design Focus: Hermes: a situated display

2.5 Devices for virtual reality and 3D interaction

2.6 Physical controls, sensors and special devices

Design Focus: Feeling the road

Design Focus: Smart-Its – making sensors easy

2.7 Paper: printing and scanning

Design Focus: Readability of text

2.8 Memory

2.9 Processing and networks

Design Focus: The myth of the infinitely fast machine

2.10 Summary

Exercises

Recommended reading

Chapter 3 The interaction

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Models of interaction

Design Focus: Video recorder

3.3 Frameworks and HCI

3.4 Ergonomics

Design Focus: Industrial interfaces

3.5 Interaction styles

Design Focus: Navigation in 3D and 2D

3.6 Elements of the WIMP interface

Design Focus: Learning toolbars

3.7 Interactivity

3.8 The context of the interaction

Design Focus: Half the picture?

3.9 Experience, engagement and fun

3.10 Summary

Exercises

Recommended reading

Chapter 4 Paradigms

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Paradigms for interaction

4.3 Summary

Exercises

Recommended reading

Part 2 Design process

Chapter 5 Interaction design basics

5.1 Introduction

5.2 What is design?

5.3 The process of design

5.4 User focus

Design Focus: Cultural probes

5.5 Scenarios

5.6 Navigation design

Design Focus: Beware the big button trap

Design Focus: Modes

5.7 Screen design and layout

Design Focus: Alignment and layout matter

Design Focus: Checking screen colors

5.8 Iteration and prototyping

5.9 Summary

Exercises

Recommended reading

Chapter 6 HCI in the software process

6.1 Introduction

6.2 The software life cycle

6.3 Usability engineering

6.4 Iterative design and prototyping

Design Focus: Prototyping in practice

6.5 Design rationale

6.6 Summary

Exercises

Recommended reading

Chapter 7 Design rules

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Principles to support usability

7.3 Standards

7.4 Guidelines

7.5 Golden rules and heuristics

7.6 HCI patterns

7.7 Summary

Exercises

Recommended reading

Chapter 8 Implementation support

8.1 Introduction

8.2 Elements of windowing systems

8.3 Programming the application

Design Focus: Going with the grain

8.4 Using toolkits

Design Focus: Java and AWT

8.5 User interface management systems

8.6 Summary

Exercises

Recommended reading

Chapter 9 Evaluation techniques

9.1 What is evaluation?

9.2 Goals of evaluation

9.3 Evaluation through expert analysis

9.4 Evaluation through user participation

9.5 Choosing an evaluation method<

Back Cover

Much has changed since the first edition of human–computer interaction was published. Ubiquitous computing and rich sensor-filled environments are finding their way out of the laboratory, not just into movies but also into our workplaces and homes. The computer has broken out of its plastic and glass bounds providing us with networked societies where personal computing devices from mobile phones to smart cards fill our pockets and electronic devices surround us at home and work. The web too has grown from a largely academic network into the hub of business and everyday lives. As the distinctions between the physical and the digital, and between work and leisure start to break down, human-computer interaction is also changing radically.

The excitement of these changes is captured in this new edition, which also looks forward to other emerging technologies. However, the book is firmly rooted in strong principles and models independent of the passing technologies of the day: these foundations will be the means by which today’s students will understand tomorrow’s technology.

The third edition of human–computer interaction can be used for introductory and advanced courses on HCI, Interaction Design, Usability or Interactive Systems Design. It will also prove an invaluable reference for professionals wishing to design usable computing devices.

Accompanying the text is a comprehensive website containing a broad range of material for instructors, students and practitioners, a full text search facility for the book, links to many sites of additional interest and much more: go to www.hcibook.com

 

New to this edition:

  • A revised structure, reflecting the growth of HCI as a discipline, separates out basic material suitable for introductory courses from more detailed models and theories.
  • New chapter on Interaction Design adds material on scenarios and basic navigation design.
  • New chapter on Universal Design, substantially extending the coverage of this material in the book.
  • Updated and extended treatment of socio/contextual issues.
  • Extended and new material on novel interaction, including updated ubicomp material, designing experience, physical sensors and a new chapter on rich interaction.
  • Updated material on the web including dynamic content and WAP.

Alan Dix is Professor in the Department of Computing, Lancaster, UK. Janet Finlay is Professor at the School of Computing, Leeds Metropolitan University, UK. Gregory Abowd is Assistant Professor in the College of Computing at Georgia Tech, USA. Russell Beale is lecturer at the School of Computer Science, University of Birmingham, UK.

 

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