Introduction Functional Programming

Series
Prentice Hall
Author
Richard Bird  
Publisher
Pearson
Cover
Softcover
Edition
2
Language
English
Total pages
433
Pub.-date
April 1998
ISBN13
9780134843469
ISBN
0134843460
Related Titles



Description

After the success of the first edition of Introduction to Functional Programming, the authors have thoroughly updated and revised this bestselling title. This book is unusual amongst books on functional programming in that it is primarily directed towards the concepts of functional programming, rather than their realization in a specific programming language. The book clearly expounds the construction of functional programs as a process of mathematical calculation, but the mathematics is restricted to that relevant to the actual construction of programs.

Features

  • Now uses Haskell 3.1.
  • All chapters have been rewritten and substantially updated
  • New case studies, including a substantial application involving an automatic proof tool.
  • A calculus of time complexity is included.
  • The treatment of data types and recursion comes much earlier than the previous edition.
  • Exercises have been changed and simplified.
  • There is a new chapter on abstract datatypes in a functional setting.
  • There is a simple yet coherent treatment of the Haskell class.
  • The laws of functional programming have been made more coherent.
  • Includes a treatment of monadic input-output.

Table of Contents

1. Fundamental Concepts.
2. Simple Datatypes.
3. Numbers.
4. Lists.
5. Examples.
6. Trees.
7. Efficiency.
8. Abstract Datatypes.
9. Monads and Interaction.
10. Case Study.

Back Cover

After the success of the first edition, Introduction to Functional Programming using Haskell has been thoroughly updated and revised to provide a complete grounding in the principles and techniques of programming with functions. The second edition uses the popular language Haskell to express functional programs. There are new chapters on program optimisation, abstract datatypes in a functional setting, and programming in a monadic style. There are complete new case studies, and many new exercises. As in the first edition, there is an emphasis on the fundamental techniques for reasoning about functional programs, and for deriving them systematically from their specifications. The book is self-contained, assuming no prior knowledge of programming and is suitable as an introductory undergraduate text for first- or second-year students.