Feedback Control Systems

Series
Prentice Hall
Author
Charles L. Phillips / John Parr  
Publisher
Pearson
Cover
Softcover
Edition
5
Language
English
Total pages
784
Pub.-date
November 2010
ISBN13
9780131866140
ISBN
0131866141
Related Titles



Description

For junior/senior-level Control Theory courses in Electrical, Mechanical, and Aerospace Engineering.

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For a First Course in Control Systems.

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Feedback Control Systems, 5e offers a thorough analysis of the principles of classical and modern feedback control in language that can be understood by students and practicing engineers with no prior background in the subject matter. Organized into three sections - analog control systems, digital control systems, and nonlinear analog control systems -this text helps students understand the difference between mathematical models and the physical systems that the models represent.

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The Fifth edition provides a new introduction to modern control analysis and design for digital systems, the addition of emulation methods of design for digital control, and numerous other updates.

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Features

New introduction to modern control analysis and design for digital systems. (Chapter 14)

 

Addition of emulation methods of design for digital control. (Chapter 13)

 

Additional system modeling example added, providing additional exposure to practical problems in developing mathematical models for physical system. (Chapter 2)

 

New Appendix E features answers to selected problems. Appendix E contains answers (not solutions) to selected end-of-chapter problems, providing students with immediate feedback on their work. End-of-chapter problems are arranged into sets that correspond to sections within the chapter; Appendix E features answers to at least one problem in each set.

 

Written with introductory students in mind. The authors have written this text for students and practicing engineers who are studying control systems for the first time. They provide many examples of system analysis and controller design that focus on one key concept to give readers the chance to absorb the material without being overwhelmed by unnecessary complexity. The end-of-chapter problems have been developed with the same philosophy.

 

Maximum text and course flexibility. More advanced material appears toward the end of each chapter, and topics can be easily omitted, enabling instructors to tailor the book to meet their course needs.

 

The SIMULINK simulation program illustrates feedback effects, which aids in student comprehension by helping to demonstrate design examples and problems.

 

Computer verification of results exposes students to a short MATLAB program when working almost all examples and problems. 

 

Design procedures implemented in MATLAB m-files.

 

Practical application examples allow students to better relate the mathematical developments to physical systems. 

 

Chapter-end problems lead students through a second method of the solution so they can verify results. 

 

Transfer-function and state-variable models familiarize students with both models for the analysis and design of linear analog systems. 

 

System stability discussion included, along with the Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion.

 

Coverage of nonlinear system analysis methods emphasizes describing-function analysis, linearization, and the state-plane analysis. 

 

Early coverage of expanded frequency-response design criteria helps explain closed-loop systems to students. 

 

Digital Control Systems provide students with the basic principles of digital control. 

 

The Time-scaling differential equations section prepares students to relate the transfer functions of systems examples to those of practical problems.

 

New to this Edition

  • More than 70% of the end-of-chapter problem sets are new or revised
  • Additional examples
  • Additional explanation of some concepts and procedures
  • More extensive use of MATLAB in examples and problem sets.
  • Companion Website contains M-files
  • A new Appendix that introduces control system applications of MATLAB.
  • A new Appendix with answers for selected end-of-chapter problems.
  • The end-of-chapter problems are grouped into sets so that each set corresponds to a section of the chapter. In each set at least one problem has its answer provided in Appendix E. Other problems in the set are based on the same concepts as the one with its answer given. This can provide immediate feedback to students in cases where the problems do not provide a second method of verification.
  • A new chapter (14) on Discrete -Time Pole-Assignment and State Estimation has been added.

Table of Contents

1    INTRODUCTION

1.1  The Control Problem 

1.2  Examples of Control Systems

1.3  Short History of Control  

References 

 

2    MODELS OF PHYSICAL SYSTEMS  

2.1  System Modeling   

2.2  Electrical Circuits   

2.3  Block Diagrams and Signal Flow Graphs  

2.4  Masonís Gain Formula   

2.5  Mechanical Translational Systems  

2.6  Mechanical Rotational Systems  

2.7  Electromechanical Systems  

2.8  Sensors  

2.9  Temperature-control System  

2.10 Analogous Systems  

2.11 Transformers and Gears  

2.12 Robotic Control System   

2.13 System Identification   

2.14 Linearization   

2.15 Summary  

References  

Problems

 

3    STATE-VARIABLE MODELS  

3.1  State-Variable Modeling  

3.2  Simulation Diagrams  

3.3  Solution of State Equations  

3.4  Transfer Functions  

3.5  Similarity Transformations  

3.6  Digital Simulation   

3.7  Controls Software   

3.8  Analog Simulation   

3.9  Summary   

References   

Problems   

 

4    SYSTEM RESPONSES  

4.1  Time Response of First-Order Systems   

4.2  Time Response of Second-order Systems   

4.3  Time Response Specifications in Design   

4.4  Frequency Response of Systems   

4.5  Time and Frequency Scaling   

4.6  Response of Higher-order Systems   

4.7  Reduced-order Models   

4.8  Summary   

References   

Problems   

 

5    CONTROL SYSTEM CHARACTERISTICS   

5.1  Closed-loop Control System   

5.2  Stability   

5.3  Sensitivity   

5.4  Disturbance Rejection   

5.5  Steady-state Accuracy   

5.6  Transient Response   

5.7  Closed-loop Frequency Response  

5.8  Summary   

References  

Problems   

 

6    STABILITY ANALYSIS

6.1  Routh-Hurwitz Stability Criterion   

6.2  Roots of the Characteristic Equation   

6.3  Stability by Simulation   

6.4  Summary  

Problems  

 

7    ROOT-LOCUS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN   

7.1  Root-Locus Principles  

7.2  Some Root-Locus Techniques  

7.3  Additional Root-Locus Techniques  

7.4  Additional Properties of the Root Locus   

7.5  Other Configurations  

7.6  Root-Locus Design   

7.7  Phase-lead Design   

7.8  Analytical Phase-Lead Design   

7.9  Phase-Lag Design   

7.10 PID Design   

7.11 Analytical PID Design   

7.12 Complementary Root Locus  

7.13 Compensator Realization   

7.14 Summary  

References  

Problems 

 

8    FREQUENCY-RESPONSE ANALYSIS 

8.1  Frequency Responses  

8.2  Bode Diagrams  

8.3  Additional Terms  

8.4  Nyquist Criterion   

8.5  Application of the Nyquist Criterion   

8.6  Relative Stability and the Bode Diagram  

8.7  Closed-Loop Frequency Response  

8.8  Summary  

References  

Problems 

 

9    FREQUENCY-RESPONSE DESIGN   

9.1  Control System Specifications  

9.2  Compensation   

9.3  Gain Compensation   

9.4  Phase-Lag Compensation   

9.5  Phase-Lead Compensation    

9.6  Analytical Design  

9.7  Lag-Lead Compensation  

9.8  PID Controller Design   

9.9  Analytical PID Controller Design   

9.10 PID Controller Implementation   

9.11 Frequency-Response Software  

9.12 Summary  

References  

Problems 

 

10   MODERN CONTROL DESIGN  

10.1 Pole-Placement Design  

10.2 Ackermannís Formula  

10.3 State Estimation  

10.4 Closed-Loop System Characteristics  

10.5 Reduced-Order Estimators  

10.6 Controllability and Observability  

10.7 Systems with Inputs  

10.8 Summary  

References  

Problems  

 

11   DISCRETE-TIME SYSTEMS  

11.1 Discrete-Time System  

11.2 Transform Methods  

11.3 Theorems of the z-Transform  

11.4 Solution of Difference Equations  

11.5 Inverse z-Transform  

11.6 Simulation Diagrams and Flow Graphs 

11.7 State Variables  

11.8 Solution of State Equations  

11.9 Summary  

References  

Problems 

 

12   SAMPLED-DATA SYSTEMS   

12.1 Sampled Data  

12.2 Ideal Sampler  

12.3 Properties of the Starred Transform  

12.4 Data Reconstruction  

12.5 Pulse Transfer Function  

12.6 Open-Loop Systems Containing Digital Filters  

12.7 Closed-Loop Discrete-Time Systems  

12.8 Transfer Functions for Closed-Loop Systems  

12.9 State Variables for Sampled-Data Systems  

12.10     Summary  

References  

Problems  

 

13   ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS 

13.1 Two Examples

13.2 Discrete System Stability 

13.3 Juryís Test  

13.4 Mapping the s-Plane into the z-Plane

13.5 Root Locus   

13.6 Nyquist Criterion   

13.7 Bilinear Transformation   

13.8 RouthñHurwitz Criterion   

13.9 Bode Diagram   

13.10     Steady-State Accuracy 

13.11     Design of Digital Control Systems 

13.12     Phase-Lag Design  

13.13     Phase-Lead Design 

13.14     Digital PID Controllers 

13.15     Root-Locus Design 

13.16     Summary  

References  

Problems  

 

14 DISCRETE-TIME POLE-ASSIGNMENT AND STATE ESTIMATION

14.1 Introduction

14.2 Pole Assignment

14.3 State Estimtion

14.4 Reduced-Order Observers

14.5 Current Observers

14.6 Controllability and Observability

14.7 Systems and Inputs

14.8 Summary

     References

     Problems

 

 

15   NONLINEAR SYSTEM ANALYSIS   

15.1 Nonlinear System Definitions and Properties  

15.2 Review of the Nyquist Criterion   

15.3 Describing Function   

15.4 Derivations of Describing Functions  

15.5 Use of the Describing Function   

15.6 Stability of Limit Cycles  

15.7 Design   

15.8 Application to Other Systems  

15.9 Linearization  

15.10     Equilibrium States and Lyapunov Stability  

15.11     State Plane Analysis  

15.12     Linear-System Response  

15.13     Summary  

 

References  

Problems 

APPENDICES   

 

A    Matrices 

B    Laplace Transform 

C    Laplace Transform and z-Transform Tables 

D    MATLAB Commands Used in This Text

E    Answers to Selected Problems

 

INDEX    

Author

Professor John M. Parr received his Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Auburn University in 1969, an MSEE from the Naval Postgraduate School in 1974, and a PhD in Electrical Engineering from Auburn University in 1988.  A retired U.S. Navy Officer, he served as a Program Manager/Project Engineer at Naval Electronic Systems Command in Washington, DC and Officer in Charge - Naval Ammunition Production Engineering Center, Crane, Indiana in addition to sea duty in five ships. Dr. Parr participated in research related to the Space Defense Initiative at Auburn University before joining the faculty at the University of Evansville. Dr. Parr is a co-author of another successful Electrical Engineering textbook, Signals, System and Transforms, by Phillips, Parr and Riskin. He is a registered professional engineer in Indiana, and is a member of the scientific research society Sigma Xi, the American Society of Engineering Educators (ASEE), and a Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE)

Reader Review(s)

"This book presents mathematically oriented classical control theory in a concise manner such that undergraduate students are not overwhelmed by the complexity of the materials. In each chapter, it is organized such that the more advanced material is placed toward the end of the chapter." - Jongeun Choi, Michigan State University

"This book is self-contained and ideal for teaching the classical control theory for junior- and senior-level undergraduate students." - Jongeun Choi, Michigan State University

"For those who are considering a career as a control systems engineer, I think this text is a great introduction to classical control system design." - John Schmitt, Oregon State University

"[The greatest strengths of this text are] The mathematical foundation provided for all of the concepts introduced. Almost all concepts presented in the text are supported by a mathematical derivation." - John Schmitt, Oregon State University

"I feel the text is very comprehensive and the updates with MATLAB are very good." - Satish S. Nair, University of Missouri