8051 Microcontroller and Embedded Systems, The: Pearson New International Edition

Series
Pearson
Author
Muhammad Ali Mazidi / Janice G. Mazidi / Rolin D. McKinlay  
Publisher
Pearson
Cover
Softcover
Edition
2
Language
English
Total pages
640
Pub.-date
August 2013
ISBN13
9781292026572
ISBN
129202657X
Related Titles


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9781292026572
8051 Microcontroller and Embedded Systems, The: Pearson New International Edition
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Description

Preface

 

Introduction

 

The Classical Period: Nineteenth Century Sociology

Auguste Comte (1798-1857) on Women in Positivist Society

Harriett Martineau (1802-1876) on American Women

Bebel, August (1840-1913) on Women and Socialism

Emile Durkheim (1858-1917) on the Division of Labor and Interests in Marriage

Herbert Spencer (1820-1903) on the Rights and Status of Women

Lester Frank Ward (1841-1913) on the Condition of Women

Anna Julia Cooper (1858-1964) on the Voices of Women

Thorstein Veblen (1857-1929) on Dress as Pecuniary Culture

 

 

The Progressive Era: Early Twentieth Century Sociology

Georg Simmel (1858-1918) on Conflict between Men and Women

Mary Roberts (Smith) Coolidge (1860-1945) on the Socialization of Girls

Anna Garlin Spencer (1851-1932) on the Woman of Genius

Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935) on the Economics of Private Household Work

Leta Stetter Hollingworth (1886-1939) on Compelling Women to Bear Children

Alexandra Kolontai (1873-1952) on Women and Class

Edith Abbott (1876-1957) on Women in Industry

 

 

1920s and 1930s: Institutionalizing the Discipline, Defining the Canon

Du Bois, W. E. B. (1868-1963) on the “Damnation” of Women

Edward Alsworth Ross (1866-1951) on Masculinism

Anna Garlin Spencer (1851-1932) on Husbands and Wives

Robert E. Park (1864-1944) and Ernest W. Burgess (1886-1966) On Sex Differences

William Graham Sumner (1840-1910) on Women’s Natural Roles

Sophonisba P. Breckinridge (1866-1948) on Women as Workers and Citizens

Margaret Mead (1901-1978) on the Cultural Basis of Sex Difference

Willard Walter Waller (1899-1945) on Rating and Dating

 

 

The 1940s: Questions about Women’s New Roles

Edward Alsworth Ross (1866-1951) on Sex Conflict

Alva Myrdal (1902-1986) on Women’s Conflicting Roles

Talcott Parsons (1902-1979) on Sex in the United StatesSocial Structure

Joseph Kirk Folsom (1893-1960) on Wives’ Changing Roles

Gunnar Myrdal (1898-1987) on Democracy and Race, an American Dilemma

Mirra Komarovsky (1905-1998) on Cultural Contradictions of Sex Roles

Robert Staughton Lynd (1892-1970) on Changes in Sex Roles

 

 

The 1950s: Questioning the Paradigm

Viola Klein (1908-1971) on the Feminine Stereotype

Mirra Komarovsky (1905-1998), Functional Analysis of Sex Roles

Helen Mayer Hacker on Women as a Minority Group

William H. Whyte (1917-1999) on the Corporate Wife

Talcott Parsons and Robert F. Bales on the Functions of Sex Roles

Alva Myrdal (1902-1986) and Viola Klein (1908-1971) on Women’s Two Roles

Helen Mayer Hacker on the New Burdens of Masculinity

Features

  • A new chapter on 8051 C programming (Chapter 7)
  • A new section on the 8051 C programming of timers (Section 9.3)
  • A new section on the second serial port of the DS89C4x0 chip (Section 10.4)
  • A new section on the 8051 C programming of the second serial port (Section 10.5)
  • A new section on the 8051 C programming of interrupts (Section 11.6)
  • Programming of the 1KB SRAM of the DS89C4x0 chip (Section 14.4)
  • A new section on the 8051 C programming of external memory (Section 14.5)
  • A new chapter on the DS12887 RTC (real-time clock) chip (Chapter 16)
  • A new chapter on motors, relays, and optoisolators (Chapter 17)
  •  Appendix A describes each 8051 instruction in detail, with examples. Appendix A also provides the clock count for instructions, 8051 register diagrams, and RAM memory maps.
  • Appendix B describes basics of wire wrapping.
  • Appendix C covers IC technology and logic families, as well as 8051 I/O port interfacing and fan-out. Make sure you study this before connecting the 8051 to an external device. 
  • Appendix D, the use of flowcharts and psuedocode is explored.
  • Appendix E is for students familiar with x86 architecture who need to make a rapid transition to 8051 architecture.
  • Appendix F provides the table of ASCII characters.
  • Appendix G lists resources for assembler shareware, and electronics parts.
  • Appendix H contains data sheets for the 8051 and other IC chips.

New to this Edition

New Features:

• A new chapter on 8051 C programming (Chapter 7)

• A new section on the 8051 C programming of timers (Section 9.3)

• A new section on the second serial port of the DS89C4x0 chip (Section 10.4)

• A new section on the 8051 C programming of the second serial port (Section 10.5)

• A new section on the 8051 C programming of interrupts (Section 11.6)

• Programming of the 1KB SRAM of the DS89C4x0 chip (Section 14.4)

• A new section on the 8051 C programming of external memory (Section 14.5)

• A new chapter on the DS12887 RTC (real-time clock) chip (Chapter 16)

• A new chapter on motors, relays, and optoisolators (Chapter 17)

Table of Contents

CHAPTER 0: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING 1

Section 0.1: Numbering and coding systems 2

Section 0.2: Digital primer 9

Section 0.3: Inside the computer 13

CHAPTER 1: THE 8051 MICROCONTROLLERS 23

Section 1.1: Microcontrollers and embedded processors 24

Section 1.2: Overview of the 8051 family 28

CHAPTER 2: 8051 ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING 37

Section 2.1: Inside the 8051 38

Section 2.2: Introduction to 8051 Assembly programming 41

Section 2.3: Assembling and running an 8051 program 44

Section 2.4: The program counter and ROM space in the 8051 46

Section 2.5: 8051 data types and directives 49

Section 2.6: 8051 flag bits and the PSW register 52

Section 2.7: 8051 register banks and stack 55

CHAPTER 3: JUMP, LOOP, AND CALL INSTRUCTIONS 69

Section 3.1: Loop and jump instructions 70

Section 3.2: Call instructions 75

Section 3.3: Time delay for various 8051 chips 80

CHAPTER 4: I/OPORT PROGRAMMING 93

Section 4.1: 8051 I/O programming 94

Section 4.2: I/O bit manipulation programming 100

CHAPTER 5: 8051 ADDRESSING MODES 109

Section 5.1: Immediate and register addressing modes 110

Section 5.2: Accessing memory using various addressing modes 112

Section 5.3: Bit addresses for I/O and RAM 122

Section 5.4: Extra 128-byte on-chip RAM in 8052 131

CHAPTER 6: ARITHMETIC & LOGIC INSTRUCTIONS

AND PROGRAMS 139

Section 6.1: Arithmetic instructions 140

Section 6.2: Signed number concepts and arithmetic operations 150

Section 6.3: Logic and compare instructions 155

Section 6.4: Rotate instruction and data serialization 161

Section 6.5: BCD, ASCII, and other application programs 167

CHAPTER 7: 8051 PROGRAMMING IN C 181

Section 7.1: Data types and time delay in 8051 C 182

Section 7.2: I/O programming in 8051 C 188

Section 7.3: Logic operations in 8051 C 194

Section 7.4: Data conversion programs in 8051 C 199

Section 7.5: Accessing code ROM space in 8051 C 204

Section 7.6: Data serialization using 8051 C 209

CHAPTER 8: 8051 HARDWARE CONNECTION AND

INTEL HEX FILE 217

Section 8.1: Pin description of the 8051 218

Section 8.2: Design and test of DS89C4x0 trainer 224

Section 8.3: Explaining the Intel hex file 232

CHAPTER 9: 8051 TIMER PROGRAMMING

IN ASSEMBLY AND C 239

Section 9.1: Programming 8051 timers 240

Section 9.2: Counter programming 255

Section 9.3: Programming timers 0 and 1 in 8051 C 260

CHAPTER 10: 8051 SERIAL PORT PROGRAMMING

IN ASSEMBLY AND C 277

Section 10.1: Basics of serial communication 278

Section 10.2: 8051 connection to RS232 285

Section 10.3: 8051 serial port programming in Assembly 287

Section 10.4: Programming the second serial port 300

Section 10.5: Serial port programming in C 306

CHAPTER 11: INTERRUPTS PROGRAMMING

IN ASSEMBLY AND C 317

Section 11.1: 8051 interrupts 318

Section 11.2: Programming timer interrupts 322

Section 11.3: Programming external hardware interrupts 326

Section 11.4: Programming the serial communication interrupt 333

Section 11.5: Interrupt priority in the 8051/52 337

Section 11.6: Interrupt programming in C 340

CHAPTER 12: LCD AND KEYBOARD INTERFACING 351

Section 12.1: LCD interfacing 352

Section 12.2: Keyboard interfacing 363

CHAPTER 13: ADC, DAC, AND SENSOR INTERFACING 373

Section 13.1: Parallel and serial ADC 374

Section 13.2: DAC interfacing 398

Section 13.3: Sensor interfacing and signal conditioning 403

CHAPTER 14: 8051 INTERFACING TO EXTERNAL MEMORY 411

Section 14.1: Semiconductor memory 412

Section 14.2: Memory address decoding 422

Section 14.3: 8031/51 interfacing with external ROM 425

Section 14.4: 8051 data memory space 430

Section 14.5: Accessing external data memory in 8051 C 440

CHAPTER 15: 8051 INTERFACING WITH THE 8255 449

Section 15.1: Programming the 8255 450

Section 15.2: 8255 interfacing 458

Section 15.3: 8051 C programming for the 8255 462

CHAPTER 16: DS12887 RTC INTERFACING

AND PROGRAMMING 467

Section 16.1: DS12887 RTC interfacing 468

Section 16.2: DS12887 RTC programming in C 476

Section 16.3: Alarm, SQW, and IRQ features of the

DS12887 chip 479

CHAPTER 17: MOTOR CONTROL: RELAY, PWM, DC,

AND STEPPER MOTORS 491

Section 17.1: Relays and optoisolators 492

Section 17.2: Stepper motor interfacing 498

Section 17.3: DC motor interfacing and PWM 507

APPENDIX A: 8051 INSTRUCTIONS, TIMING, AND REGISTERS 523

APPENDIX B: BASICS OF WIRE WRAPPING 563

APPENDIX C: IC TECHNOLOGY AND SYSTEM DESIGN ISSUES 567

APPENDIX D: FLOWCHARTS AND PSEUDOCODE 587

APPENDIX E: 8051 PRIMER FOR X86 PROGRAMMERS 592

APPENDIX F: ASCII CODES 593

APPENDIX G: ASSEMBLERS, DEVELOPMENT RESOURCES,

AND SUPPLIERS 594

APPENDIX H: DATA SHEETS 596

INDEX 617