West, The: A Narrative History to 1660, Volume 1

Series
Pearson
Author
A. Daniel Frankforter / William M. Spellman  
Publisher
Pearson
Cover
Softcover
Edition
3
Language
English
Total pages
496
Pub.-date
December 2011
ISBN13
9780205180936
ISBN
0205180930
Related Titles


Product detail

Product Price CHF Available  
9780205180936
West, The: A Narrative History to 1660, Volume 1
123.70 approx. 7-9 days

Free evaluation copy for lecturers


Description

View the Preview Kit to learn more!


The book students will read: Concise. Relevant. Accessible.

 

The West: A Narrative History is a concise but not abridged introduction to the West, encompassing all cultures that trace their ancestry to the ancient Mediterranean world. It is not a reduced version of a larger study, but a full narrative of the West written concisely.

 

This learning program is built around a Key Question in every chapter, a feature that shows students why western civilization is relevant for them. Students will discover the key questions that define the past are in many ways the same key questions of today. Since students often see conflict between a Christian “West” and an Islamic “East” in today’s society, the authors highlight the ongoing role the Middle East has played in shaping the West. Students will understand the links between people of the West and those in other regions.

 

The West is an accessible program available in several formats to give instructors and students more choices and more ways to save. With the release of the 3rd edition, The West becomes an integrated program tied closely to the new MyHistoryLab.

 

A better teaching and learning experience
This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience—for you and your students. Here’s how:

  • Personalize Learning – The new MyHistoryLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals.
  • Improve Critical Thinking – Each chapter opens with a Key Question and a brief Key Question essay. The Key Question is revisited at the end of the chapter, and MyHistoryLab Icons and Connections features ensure close integration with the new MyHistoryLab.
  • Engage Students – Maps, illustrations, and a biography feature promote discussion of the narrative.
  • Support Instructors - MyHistoryLab, Annotated Instructor’s eText, Class Preparation Tool, Instructor’s Manual, MyTest, and PowerPoints are available.

For volume two of this text, search ISBN-10: 0205180914

For the combined volume of this text, search ISBN-10: 0205180957

Features

THE BOOK STUDENTS WILL READ: CONCISE. RELEVANT. ACCESSIBLE.

  • The West is a concise history that is not abridged, so students learn the full story of Western civilization.
  • The Key Question features provide a springboard for wide-ranging class discussion of topics that are relevant to today’s students. (ex. p. 35)
  • This learning program is accessible to students. It is closely integrated with the new MyHistoryLab and comes in several formats for more options and more ways to save.
  • The text is divided into eight parts, each beginning with an illustration, a brief introduction, and a timeline, to help students understand the vast time period covered. (ex. p. 64)
  • Chronological charts within the chapters help students visualize the sequence of events discussed. (ex. p. 91)

PERSONALIZE LEARNING WITH NEW MYHISTORYLAB

The new MyHistoryLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals.

  • The Pearson eText lets students access their textbook anytime, anywhere, and any way they want–including listening online or downloading to iPad.
  • A personalized study plan for each student, based on Bloom’s Taxonomy, promotes critical-thinking skills and helps students succeed in the course and beyond.
  • Assessment tied to videos, applications, and chapters enables instructors and students to track progress and get immediate feedback. Instructors will be able to find the best resources for teaching their students.
  • Class Preparation Tool collects the best class presentation resources in one convenient online destination. Resources include PowerPoint slides, streaming audio and video, audio clips for class tests and quizzes, and all illustrations for creating interactive lectures.
  • Closer Look tours walk students through key primary sources in detail, helping them to uncover their meaning and understand their context.
  • Lecture and Archival Videos include speeches, news footage, and brief discussions by experts on topics mentioned in the text.
  • New MyHistoryLab Icons appear in the margins of the text to connect resources and media assignments in MyHistoryLab to specific topics within the chapters. The icons are labeled Read the Document, View the Image, See the Map, Watch the Video, Hear the Audio, and Study and Review. (ex. p. 92)
  • New MyHistoryLab Connections sections at the end of each chapter in the text list the analytical questions that drive the program’s chapter Study Plan and provide an inventory of resources marked by the MyHistoryLab Icons within the chapter. The analytical questions are ordered from less complex thinking to higher critical thinking. (ex. p. 94)
  • The new Annotated Instructor’s eText serves as a hub for all instructor resources, with chapter-by-chapter links to PowerPoint slides and MyHistoryLab’s ClassPrep engine. It also includes content from the Instructor’s Manual and the MyHistoryLab Instructor’s Guide.
  • MyHistoryLibrary includes hundreds of excerpts from primary sources, including many referenced in the text, and the History Bookshelf, which includes 100 of the most commonly assigned complete works.

IMPROVE CRITICAL THINKING

  • Integrated MyHistoryLab learning tools, including MyHistoryLab Icons and a Study Plan in the MyHistoryLab Connections section for every chapter, ensure student success in learning to think critically about the past. (ex. p. 100)
  • Each chapter opens with the following resources:
    • A Key Question that reflects the chapter’s theme and promotes understanding of important topics. (ex. p. 155)
    • A brief Key Question essay. (ex. p. 189)
    • A vivid image with learning objective questions. (ex. p. 154)
    • Quotations from primary sources. (ex. p. 249)
  • Each chapter ends with resources to help students master the information from the chapter:
    • The Key Question Revisited reexamines the chapter-opening Key Question. A brief essay highlights what a particular moment in history suggests about the possibilities for answering the Key Question. (ex. p. 277)
    • Key Terms draw students’ attention to important terminology that appears in bold type within the narrative. (ex. p. 122)
    • New Suggested Activities sections propose various student research projects. (ex. p. 152)
    • New Further Reading sections encourage students to continue exploring topics covered in the chapter. (ex. p. 184)

ENGAGE STUDENTS

  • “People in Context” features present biographies that add human interest to the narrative. (ex. p. 78)
  • Colorful maps in each chapter raise questions about the influence of geography and environment on history. (ex. p. 271)
  • Abundant illustrations in each chapterinclude cartoons, fine art, and photographs and reinforce the notion that historians work from visual as well as written sources. In-depth captions explore how these visual sources illustrate themes and events discussed in the narrative. (ex. p. 119)

SUPPORT INSTRUCTORS

  • The new Annotated Instructor’s eText serves as a hub for all instructor resources, with chapter-by-chapter links to PowerPoint slides and MyHistoryLab’s ClassPrep engine. It also includes content from the Instructor’s Manual and the MyHistoryLab Instructor’s Guide.
  • The Instructor’s Resource Manual contains chapter summaries, chapter outlines with references to the MyHistoryLab resources cited in the text, learning objectives from the text, lecture topics, class discussion topics, and the MyHistoryLab Connections feature found at the end of each chapter in the text. Available within the instructor account at www.MyHistoryLab.com or at www.pearsonhighered.com/irc.  
  • The Test Item File contains a diverse set of over 2,100 multiple choice, short answer, essay, identification, and map-based questions to support different assessment strategies. The large pool of multiple choice questions for each chapter includes factual, conceptual, and analytical questions, so instructors may assess students on basic information as well as critical thinking. Available at www.pearsonhighered.com/irc or as MyTest.
  • MyTest, a flexible online test-generating software, includes all questions found in the printed Test Bank. Instructors can quickly and easily create customized tests with MyTest. Available within the instructor account in MyHistoryLab and at http://www.pearsonmytest.com.
  • PowerPoint slides include a lecture outline for each chapter and full-color illustrations and maps from the printed text. All images from the text have captions that provide background information about the image. Available within the instructor account on MyHistoryLab or at www.pearsonhighered.com/irc.  
  • Create a Custom Text: For enrollments of at least 25, create your own textbook by combining chapters from best-selling Pearson textbooks and/or reading selections in the sequence you want. To begin building your custom text, visit www.pearsoncustomlibrary.com. You may also work with a dedicated Pearson Custom editor to create your ideal text–publishing your own original content or mixing and matching Pearson content. Contact your Pearson Publisher’s Representative to get started.

New to this Edition

THE BOOK STUDENTS WILL READ: CONCISE. RELEVANT. ACCESSIBLE.

  • The 3rd edition of The West is an integrated learning program closely tied to the new MyHistoryLab.
  • The final chapter has been revised to include coverage up to 2011.

PERSONALIZE LEARNING WITH NEW MYHISTORYLAB

The new MyHistoryLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals.

  •   The Pearson eText lets students access their textbook anytime, anywhere, and any way they want–including listening online or downloading to iPad.
  • A personalized study plan for each student, based on Bloom’s Taxonomy, promotes critical-thinking skills and helps students succeed in the course and beyond.
  • Assessment tied to videos, applications, and chapters enables instructors and students to track progress and get immediate feedback. Instructors will be able to find the best resources for teaching their students.
  • Class Preparation Tool collects the best class presentation resources in one convenient online destination. Resources include PowerPoint slides, streaming audio and video, audio clips for class tests and quizzes, and all illustrations for creating interactive lectures.
  • Closer Look tours walk students through key primary sources in detail, helping them to uncover their meaning and understand their context.
  • Lecture and Archival Videos include speeches, news footage, and brief discussions by experts on topics mentioned in the text.
  • New MyHistoryLab Icons appear in the margins of the text to connect resources and media assignments in MyHistoryLab to specific topics within the chapters. The icons are labeled Read the Document, View the Image, See the Map, Watch the Video, Hear the Audio, and Study and Review. (ex. p. 315)
  • New MyHistoryLab Connections sections at the end of each chapter in the text list the analytical questions that drive the program’s chapter Study Plan and provide an inventory of resources marked by the MyHistoryLab Icons within the chapter. The analytical questions are ordered from less complex thinking to higher critical thinking. (ex. p. 336)
  • The new Annotated Instructor’s eText serves as a hub for all instructor resources, with chapter-by-chapter links to PowerPoint slides and MyHistoryLab’s ClassPrep engine. It also includes content from the Instructor’s Manual and the MyHistoryLab Instructor’s Guide.
  • MyHistoryLibrary includes hundreds of excerpts from primary sources, including many referenced in the text, and the History Bookshelf, which includes 100 of the most commonly assigned complete works.

IMPROVE CRITICAL THINKING

  • End-of-chapter resources include two new sections:
    • Suggested Activities sections propose various student research projects. (ex. p. 246)
    • Further Reading sections encourage students to continue exploring topics covered in the chapter. (ex. p. 152)

SUPPORT INSTRUCTORS

  • The new Annotated Instructor’s eText serves as a hub for all instructor resources, with chapter-by-chapter links to PowerPoint slides and MyHistoryLab’s ClassPrep engine. It also includes content from the Instructor’s Manual and the MyHistoryLab Instructor’s Guide.
  • The Instructor’s Manual & Test Bank, MyTest, and Powerpoints have been revised to reflect changes in the 3rd edition.
  • Create a Custom Text: For enrollments of at least 25, create your own textbook by combining chapters from best-selling Pearson textbooks and/or reading selections in the sequence you want. To begin building your custom text, visit www.pearsoncustomlibrary.com. You may also work with a dedicated Pearson Custom editor to create your ideal text–publishing your own original content or mixing and matching Pearson content. Contact your Pearson Publisher’s Representative to get started.

Table of Contents

Found in this section:

1. Brief Table of Contents

2. Full Table of Contents

 


1. BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Introduction

 

Part I Departure Prehistory to 1000 B.C.E.

Chapter 1 The Birth of Civilization 

Chapter 2 The Rise of Empires and the Beginning of the Iron Age

 

Part II The Classical Era 2000 B.C.E. to 30 C.E.

Chapter 3 Aegean Civilizations

Chapter 4 The Hellenic Era  

Chapter 5 The Hellenistic Era and the Rise of Rome

Chapter 6 Rome’s Empire and the Unification of the Western World

 

Part III The Division of the West 300 to 1300

Chapter 7 The West’s Medieval Civilizations

Chapter 8 The Emergence of Europe

Chapter 9 Europe Turns Outward

Chapter 10 Europe’s High Middle Ages

 

Part IV Challenges, Conflicts, and Departures 1300 to 1700

Chapter 11 Challenges to the Medieval Order

Chapter 12 Renaissance and Exploration

Chapter 13 Reformation, Religious Wars, and National Conflicts 

 


2. FULL TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Introduction

 

Part I — Departure Prehistory to 1000 B.C.E.

 

Chapter 1: The Birth of Civilization

Key Question: How do environments shape human communities and human communities alter environments?

    The Evolution of the Prehistoric Cultures 

    The Archaic States  

    The Origin of Civilization in Mesopotamia: Sumer  

    The Rise of Civilization in Egypt

 

Chapter 2: The Rise of Empires and the Beginning of the Iron Age

Key Question: Does civilization promote or intensify divisions among peoples?

    The Transition States

    Imperial Egypt: The New Kingdom 

    The Indo-Europeans and the Clash of Empires

    The Bible and History

 

Part II —  The Classical Era 2000 B.C.E. to 30 C.E.

 

Chapter 3: Aegean Civilizations

Key Question: When does civilization in the West become “Western” civilization?

    Minoan Mentors

    The Mycenaeans, Greece’s First Civilization 

    The Aegean Dark Age

    The Hellenic Era

    The Rise of the Mainland Powers

    The Persian Wars: Crucible of a Civilization

 

Chapter 4: The Hellenic Era

Key Question: What did the Greeks contribute to the development of modern civilization?

    Persian Wars as Catalyst

    The Peloponnesian War 

    Intellectual and Artistic Life in the Polis

  

Chapter 5: The Hellenistic Era and the Rise of Rome

Key Question: What circumstances are likely to undermine governments by the people?

    The Hellenistic Era

    The Origin of Rome

    The Roman Republic

    Rome’s Civil War

 

Chapter 6: Rome’s Empire and the Unification of the Western World

Key Question:  Do people prefer order to liberty?

    The Augustan Era 

    Order and Continuity: The Dynastic Option 

    Order and Continuity: The Elective Option 

    Life in an Imperial Environment 

    The Decline of Rome

 

Part III — The Division of the West 300 to 1300

 

Chapter 7: The West’s Medieval Civilizations

Key Question:  Should freedom of religion be limited?

    The Christian Element 

    The German Element 

    The Byzantine Empire of Constantinople 

    Islam

 

Chapter 8: The Emergence of Europe

Key Question: How did Europe build on its legacies from the ancient world?

    The Merovingian Kingdom: Europe’s Nucleus

    The Franks’ Neighbors 

    The Carolingian Era 

    Retrenchment and Reorganization 

    The Culture of Europe’s Dark Age

 

Chapter 9: Europe Turns Outward

Key Question: Was conflict among the medieval civilizations inevitable?

    Islam’s Crest and Byzantium’s Resurgence

    The Reorganization of Feudal Europe

    The Eleventh-Century Turning Point

 

Chapter 10: Europe’s High Middle Ages

Key Question: Why are some societies more open to change than others?

    The Renaissance of the Twelfth Century

    Universities and Scholasticism

    Religious Revival and Diversity of Opinion

    The Artistic Vision of the High Middle Ages

    Government in the High Middle Ages

 

Part IV — Challenges, Conflicts, and Departures 1300 to 1700

 

Chapter 11: Challenges to the Medieval Order

Key Question: What did the crises of the late medieval era reveal about the strengths and weaknesses of Europe’s civilization?

    Challenges from Nature  

    Turmoil in the Middle East 

    Spiritual Crises 

    Political Responses: The Burdens of War

 

Chapter 12: Renaissance and Exploration

Key Question: How should a society use its history?

    The Context for the Renaissance  

    The Culture of the Renaissance 

    The Northern Renaissance  

    The Middle East: The Ottoman Empire 

    Europe and Atlantic Exploration

 

Chapter 13: Reformation, Religious Wars, and National Conflicts

Key Question: How do civilized societies justify war?

    The Lutheran Reformation

    The Swiss Reformation 

    The Catholic Reformation 

    The Habsburg-Valois Wars 

    England’s Ambivalent Reformation 

    Convergence of Foreign and Domestic Politics: England, Spain, and France 

    The Final Religious Upheaval 

Author

A. Daniel Frankforter is Professor of History at the Pennsylvania State University, where he has taught for four decades. His undergraduate work was in the history of ideas and philosophy at Franklin and Marshall College. He earned a Master of Divinity degree from Drew University, did graduate work at Columbia University and the University of Göttingen, and completed master’s and doctoral degrees in medieval history and religious studies at Penn State. His research interests are in English ecclesiastical history, the evolving status of women in medieval Europe, and textual criticism. Articles on these topics have appeared in such journals as Manuscripta, Church History, The British Studies Monitor, The Catholic Historical Review, The American Benedictine Review, The International Journal of Women’s Studies, and The Journal of Women’s History. His books include A History of the Christian Movement: An Essay on the Development of Christian Institutions, Civilization and Survival, The Shakespeare Name Dictionary (with J. Madison Davis), The Medieval Millennium: An Introduction, The Western Heritage, brief edition (with Donald Kagan, Stephen Ozment, and Frank Turner), The Heritage of World Civilizations, brief third edition (with Albert Craig, William Graham, Donald Kagan, Stephen Ozment, and Frank Turner), an edition and translation of Poullain de la Barre’s De L’Égalité des deux Sexes, and Stones for Bread: A Critique of Contemporary Worship. His most recent work is: Word of God/Words of Men: The Use and Abuse of Scripture. Over the course of his career he has developed 15 courses dealing with aspects of the ancient and medieval periods of Western civilization, the Judeo-Christian tradition, and gender issues. His service in the classroom has been acknowledged by the Penn State Behrend Excellence in Teaching Award and the prestigious Amoco Foundation Award for Excellence in Teaching Performance.

 

William M. Spellman is Professor of History at the University of North Carolina Asheville and Director of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges, a constorium of twenty-six institutions in the United States and Canada.  He is a graduate of Suffolk University, Boston, and holds a PhD from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University.  He is the author of John Locke and The Problem of Depravity (Oxford, 1988); The Latitudinarians and the Church of England (Georgia, 1993); John Locke (Macmillan, 1995): European Political Thought, 1600-1700 (Macmillan, 1997); Monarchies, 1000-2000 (Reaktion, 2000); The Global Community: Migration and the Making of the Modern World (Sutton, 2002): A Concise History of the World Since 1945 (Palgrave, 2006); Uncertain Identity: International Migration Since 1945 (Reaktion, 2008); and A Short History of Western Political Thought (Palgrave, 2011).

Reader Review(s)

It remains the best textbook on the topic available...It deserves to be even better known.

    - Jonathan Perry, University of South Florida

 

The questions at the beginning and questions revisited at the ends of the chapters are a great innovation--and they're helpful to the teacher. Great idea.

    -Preston Jones, John Brown University