Automation, Production Systems, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, Global Edition

Series
Pearson
Author
Mikell Groover  
Publisher
Pearson
Cover
Softcover
Edition
4
Language
English
Total pages
816
Pub.-date
April 2015
ISBN13
9781292076119
ISBN
1292076119
Related Titles


Product detail

Product Price CHF Available  
9781292076119
Automation, Production Systems, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, Global Edition
91.80 approx. 7-9 days

eBook

You'll find the eBook here.:

Free evaluation copy for lecturers


Description

Automation, Production Systems, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing is appropriate for advanced undergraduate/ graduate-level courses in Automation, Production Systems, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing.

 

This exploration of the technical and engineering aspects of automated production systems provides the most advanced, comprehensive, and balanced coverage of the subject of any text on the market. It covers all the major cutting-edge technologies of production automation and material handling, and how these technologies are used to construct modern manufacturing systems.

 

Teaching and Learning Experience

This book will provide a better teaching and learning experience—for you and your students. It will help:

  • Provide Balanced Coverage of Automated Production Systems: A quantitative approach provides numerous equations and example problems for instructors who want to include analytical and quantitative material in their courses.
  • Support Learning: End-of-chapter problems, review questions, and problem exercises give students plenty of opportunities to put theory into action.
  • Keep Your Course Current: This edition provides up-to-date coverage of production systems, how they are sometimes automated and computerized, and how they can be mathematically analyzed to obtain performance metrics.

Features

Provide Balanced Coverage of Automated Production Systems
  • A quantitative approach provides numerous equations and example problems for instructors who want to include analytical and quantitative material in their courses.
  • “What the Equations Tell Us” statements follow the mathematical derivations and engineering equations. These statements list the practical meanings of the equations and guidelines regarding applications. 

Support Learning

  • End-of-chapter problems enable instructors to assign problems in class rather than design these problems themselves.
  • Review questions and problem exercises are included at the end of every chapter.
  • Application guidelines are included in several of the descriptions of the technologies.
  • Historical notes and vignettes describe the development and historical background of the automation technologies. 
  • Numerous example problems (covering several problem types) are covered in the end-of-chapter exercises.
  • The Instructor Solutions Manual contains answers to all of the review questions and solutions to all problems.
  • A complete set of PowerPoint® slides is provided for each chapter. The slides include most of the figures in the text.
  • NEW: More than 50% of the end-of-chapter problems are new or revised. The total number of problems is increased from 393 in the third edition to 416 in this edition.
  • NEW: An appendix has been added listing answers to selected end-of-chapter problems (answers to a total of 88 problems, or 21% of the end-of-chapter problems).*
  • NEW: A total of 36 new or revised figures are included in this new edition, for a total of 278 figures.
  • NEW: A list of abbreviations used in the book, located in the inside front cover, has been added for readers’ reference.

Keep Your Course Current

  • NEW: In Chapter 3, Manufacturing Metrics and Economics, many of the equations have been revised to make them more robust. A new section on cost of a manufactured part has been added.
  • NEW: In Chapter 6, Hardware Components for Automation and Process Control, new content has been added on electric motors, including linear motors and the conversion of rotary motion to linear motion.* Several new figures have been added in support of the new content.*
  • NEW: In Chapter 7, Computer Numerical Control, the appendix on APT has been removed because this method of programming has been largely replaced in industry by CAD/CAM part programming, coverage of which has been expanded in this new edition. In addition, the mathematical models of positioning control have been improved.
  • NEW: In Chapter 8, Industrial Robotics, two new robot configurations have been added and two configurations have been eliminated because they are no longer relevant.
  • NEW: In Chapter 9, Discrete Control and Programmable Logic Controllers, corrections and improvements have been made in the ladder logic examples.* A section on programmable automation controllers had been added.
  • UPDATED: In Chapter 10, Material Transport Systems, the section on AGVS technologies has been updated.
  • UPDATED: In Chapter 11, Storage Systems, the section on automated storage/retrieval systems has been updated and shortened.*
  • NEW: In Chapter 12, Automatic Identification and Data Capture, the section on radio frequency identification (RFID) has been expanded and updated.*
  • NEW: In Chapter 14, Single-Station Manufacturing Cells, coverage of CNC machining centers and related machine tools has been expanded.
  • UPDATED: In Chapter 15, Manual Assembly Lines, coverage of mixed-model assembly lines has been moved to an appendix, on the assumption that some instructors may not want to include this topic in their courses. A new section on batch-model assembly lines has been included in the appendix.
  • UPDATED: In Chapter 16, Automated Production Lines, coverage of transfer lines with internal parts storage has been moved to an appendix, on the assumption that some instructors may not want to include this topic in their courses.
  • NEW: In Chapter 18, Group Technology and Cellular Manufacturing, the organization of the text has been substantially revised. A new section on performance metrics in cell operations has been added. Coverage of parts classification and coding has been reduced, and the Opitz system has been relocated to an appendix.
  • NEW: In Chapter 19, Flexible Manufacturing Cells and Systems, sections on mass customization, reconfigurable manufacturing systems, and agile manufacturing have been added.
  • UPDATED: In Chapter 20, Quality Programs for Manufacturing, the DMAIC procedure in Six Sigma has been relocated to an appendix, on the assumption that some instructors may not want to cover the detailed methodology of Six Sigma. If they do, those details are in the appendix.
  • UPDATED: In Chapter 22, Inspection Technologies, the mathematical details of coordinate metrology have been relocated to an appendix. The section on machine vision has been updated to include recent advances in camera technology.
  • UPDATED: In Chapter 23, Product Design and CAD/CAM in the Production System, the section on CAD has been updated to be consistent with modern industrial practice.*
  • UPDATED: In Chapter 25, Production Planning and Control Systems, the section on work-in-process inventory costs has been eliminated, and the sections on MRP II and ERP have been upgraded.

Items marked with an asterisk (*) relate to recommendations made by the reviewers.

New to this Edition

Support Learning
  • More than 50% of the end-of-chapter problems are new or revised. The total number of problems is increased from 393 in the third edition to 416 in this edition.
  • An appendix has been added listing answers to selected end-of-chapter problems (answers to a total of 88 problems, or 21% of the end-of-chapter problems).*
  • A total of 36 new or revised figures are included in this new edition, for a total of 278 figures.
  • A list of abbreviations used in the book, located in the inside front cover, has been added for readers’ reference.

Keep Your Course Current

  • In Chapter 3, Manufacturing Metrics and Economics, many of the equations have been revised to make them more robust. A new section on cost of a manufactured part has been added.
  • In Chapter 6, Hardware Components for Automation and Process Control, new content has been added on electric motors, including linear motors and the conversion of rotary motion to linear motion.* Several new figures have been added in support of the new content.*
  • In Chapter 7, Computer Numerical Control, the appendix on APT has been removed because this method of programming has been largely replaced in industry by CAD/CAM part programming, coverage of which has been expanded in this new edition. In addition, the mathematical models of positioning control have been improved.
  • In Chapter 8, Industrial Robotics, two new robot configurations have been added and two configurations have been eliminated because they are no longer relevant.
  • In Chapter 9, Discrete Control and Programmable Logic Controllers, corrections and improvements have been made in the ladder logic examples.* A section on programmable automation controllers had been added.
  • In Chapter 10, Material Transport Systems, the section on AGVS technologies has been updated.
  • In Chapter 11, Storage Systems, the section on automated storage/retrieval systems has been updated and shortened.*
  • In Chapter 12, Automatic Identification and Data Capture, the section on radio frequency identification (RFID) has been expanded and updated.*
  • In Chapter 14, Single-Station Manufacturing Cells, coverage of CNC machining centers and related machine tools has been expanded.
  • In Chapter 15, Manual Assembly Lines, coverage of mixed-model assembly lines has been moved to an appendix, on the assumption that some instructors may not want to include this topic in their courses. A new section on batch-model assembly lines has been included in the appendix.
  • In Chapter 16, Automated Production Lines, coverage of transfer lines with internal parts storage has been moved to an appendix, on the assumption that some instructors may not want to include this topic in their courses.
  • In Chapter 18, Group Technology and Cellular Manufacturing, the organization of the text has been substantially revised. A new section on performance metrics in cell operations has been added. Coverage of parts classification and coding has been reduced, and the Opitz system has been relocated to an appendix.
  • In Chapter 19, Flexible Manufacturing Cells and Systems, sections on mass customization, reconfigurable manufacturing systems, and agile manufacturing have been added.
  • In Chapter 20, Quality Programs for Manufacturing, the DMAIC procedure in Six Sigma has been relocated to an appendix, on the assumption that some instructors may not want to cover the detailed methodology of Six Sigma. If they do, those details are in the appendix.
  • In Chapter 22, Inspection Technologies, the mathematical details of coordinate metrology have been relocated to an appendix. The section on machine vision has been updated to include recent advances in camera technology.
  • In Chapter 23, Product Design and CAD/CAM in the Production System, the section on CAD has been updated to be consistent with modern industrial practice.*
  • In Chapter 25, Production Planning and Control Systems, the section on work-in-process inventory costs has been eliminated, and the sections on MRP II and ERP have been upgraded.

Items marked with an asterisk (*) relate to recommendations made by the reviewers.

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

New to This Edition

Support Materials for Instructors

About the Author

Chapter1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Production Systems

1.2 Automation in Production Systems

1.3 Manual Labor in Production Systems

1.4 Automation Principles and Strategies

1.5 About This Book

PART I OVERVIEW OF MANUFACTURING

Chapter2 MANUFACTURING OPERATIONS

2.1 Manufacturing Industries and Products

2.2 Manufacturing Operations

2.3 Production Facilities

2.4 Product/Production Relationships

Chapter3 MANUFACTURING METRICS AND ECONOMICS

3.1 Production Performance Metrics

3.2 Manufacturing Costs

Appendix 3A Averaging Formulas for Equation (3.20)

PART II AUTOMATION AND CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

Chapter4 INTRODUCTION TO AUTOMATION

4.1 Basic Elements of an Automated System

4.2 Advanced Automation Functions

4.3 Levels of Automation

Chapter5 INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEMS

5.1 Process Industries versus Discrete Manufacturing Industries

5.2 Continuous versus Discrete Control

5.3 Computer Process Control

Chapter6 HARDWARE COMPONENTS FOR AUTOMATION AND

PROCESS CONTROL

6.1 Sensors

6.2 Actuators

6.3 Analog–Digital Conversions

6.4 Input/Output Devices for Discrete Data

Chapter7 COMPUTER NUMERICAL CONTROL

7.1 Fundamentals of NC Technology

7.2 Computers and Numerical Control

7.3 Applications of NC

7.4 Analysis of Positioning Systems

7.5 NC Part Programming

Appendix 7A: Coding for Manual Part Programming

Chapter8 INDUSTRIAL ROBOTICS

8.1 Robot Anatomy and Related Attributes

8.2 Robot Control Systems

8.3 End Effectors

8.4 Applications of Industrial Robots

8.5 Robot Programming

8.6 Robot Accuracy and Repeatability

Chapter9 DISCRETE CONTROL AND PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC

CONTROLLERS

9.1 Discrete Process Control

9.2 Ladder Logic Diagrams

9.3 Programmable Logic Controllers

9.4 Personal Computers and Programmable Automation Controllers

PART III MATERIAL HANDLING AND IDENTIFICATION

Chapter 10 MATERIAL TRANSPORT SYSTEMS

10.1Overview of Material Handling

10.2Material Transport Equipment

10.3Analysis of Material Transport Systems

Chapter 11 STORAGE SYSTEMS

11.1 Introduction to Storage Systems

11.2Conventional Storage Methods and Equipment

11.3Automated Storage Systems

11.4Analysis of Storage Systems

Chapter12 AUTOMATIC IDENTIFICATION AND DATA CAPTURE

12.1Overview of Automatic Identification Methods

12.2Bar Code Technology

12.3Radio Frequency Identification

12.4Other AIDC Technologies

PART IV MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS

Chapter 13 OVERVIEW OF MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS

13.1Components of a Manufacturing System

13.2Types of Manufacturing Systems

Chapter 14 SINGLE-STATION MANUFACTURING CELLS

14.1Single-Station Manned Cells

14.2Single-Station Automated Cells

14.3Applications of Single-Station Cells

14.4Analysis of Single-Station Cells

Chapter 15 MANUAL ASSEMBLY LINES

15.1Fundamentals of Manual Assembly Lines

15.2Analysis of Single-Model Assembly Lines

15.3Line Balancing Algorithms

15.4Workstation Details

15.5Other Considerations in Assembly Line Design

15.6Alternative Assembly Systems

Appendix 15A Batch-Model and Mixed-Model Lines

Chapter 16 AUTOMATED PRODUCTION LINES

16.1Fundamentals of Automated Production Lines

16.2Applications of Automated Production Lines

16.3Analysis of Transfer Lines

Appendix 16A Transfer Lines with Internal Storage

Chapter 17 AUTOMATED ASSEMBLY SYSTEMS

17.1Fundamentals of Automated Assembly Systems

17.2Analysis of Automated Assembly Systems

Chapter 18 GROUP TECHNOLOGY AND CELLULAR MANUFACTURING

18.1Part Families and Machine Groups

18.2Cellular Manufacturing

18.3Applications of Group Technology

18.4Analysis of Cellular Manufacturing

Appendix 18A Opitz Parts Classification and Coding System

Chapter 19 FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING CELLS AND SYSTEMS

19.1What is a Flexible Manufacturing System?

19.2FMC/FMS Components

19.3FMS Application Considerations

19.4Analysis of Flexible Manufacturing Systems

19.5Alternative Approaches to Flexible Manufacturing

PART V QUALITY CONTROL SYSTEMS

Chapter 20 QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR MANUFACTURING

20.1Quality in Design and Manufacturing

20.2Traditional and Modern Quality Control

20.3Process Variability and Process Capability

20.4Statistical Process Control

20.5Six Sigma

20.6Taguchi Methods in Quality Engineering

20.7ISO 9000

Appendix 20A The Six Sigma DMAIC Procedure

Chapter 21 INSPECTION PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES

21.1Inspection Fundamentals

21.2Sampling versus 100% Inspection

21.3Automated Inspection

21.4When and Where to Inspect

21.5Analysis of Inspection Systems

Chapter 22 INSPECTION TECHNOLOGIES

22.1Inspection Metrology

22.2Conventional Measuring and Gaging Techniques

22.3Coordinate Measuring Machines

22.4Surface Measurement

22.5Machine Vision

22.6Other Optical Inspection Methods

22.7Noncontact Nonoptical Inspection Techniques

Appendix 22A Geometric Feature Construction

PART VI MANUFACTURING SUPPORT SYSTEMS

Chapter 23 PRODUCT DESIGN AND CAD/CAM IN THE PRODUCTION

SYSTEM

23.1Product Design and CAD

23.2CAM, CAD/CAM, and CIM

23.3Quality Function Deployment

Chapter 24 PROCESS PLANNING AND CONCURRENT ENGINEERING

24.1Process Planning

24.2Computer-Aided Process Planning

24.3Concurrent Engineering and Design for Manufacturing

24.4Advanced Manufacturing Planning

Chapter 25 PRODUCTION PLANNING AND CONTROL SYSTEMS

25.1 Aggregate Production Planning and the Master Production

Schedule

25.2Material Requirements Planning

25.3Capacity Planning

25.4Shop Floor Control

25.5Inventory Control

25.6Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP II)

25.7 Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP)

Chapter 26 JUST-IN-TIME AND LEAN PRODUCTION

26.1Lean Production and Waste in Manufacturing

26.2Just-in-Time Production Systems

26.3Autonomation

26.4Worker Involvement

Appendix Answers to Selected Problems