Reading Concordances:An Introduction

Series
Longman
Author
John Sinclair  
Publisher
Pearson Longman
Cover
Softcover
Edition
1
Language
English
Total pages
200
Pub.-date
August 2003
ISBN13
9780582292147
ISBN
058229214X
Related Titles


Product detail

Title no longer available

Description


 This book describes the processes involved when we read concordances and uses real-life examples taken from spoken English corpuses. It presents a highly practical course on reading concordances providing exercises and examples. The reader is encouraged to build on their knowledge as they are taken through the topics step-by-step so that eventually they can form a working hypothesis that will enable them to make informed linguistic observations.

Features

  • Features an interactive question and answer about selected words and phrases.
  • Explains the method of teaching linguistics through careful observation and interpretation of what turns up in real data - specifically, data delivered to the student as computer concordances.
  • Uses the evidence of computer-held corpora, whether for study of language, teaching of it, resolving problems and questions about usage, standards etc.
  • Application and skills based rather than simply explanatory

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgements

LEVEL 1:

TASK 1: HOW MEANINGS ARE SHOWN
Theme: meaning distinction
Word/phrase: block

TASK 2: UNDERLYING REGULARITY
Theme: regularity and variation
Word/phrase: gamut

TASK 3: WORDS AS LIABILITIES
Theme: semantic prosody
Word/phrase: regime

TASK 4: LITERAL AND METAPHORICAL
Theme: meaning in phrases
Word/phrase: free hand

TASK 5: MEANING FOCUS
Theme: co-selection
Word/phrase: physical

LEVEL 2:

TASK 6: SPECIALISED MEANING
Theme: lexical item
Word/phrase: brook

TASK 7: SUBTLE DISTINCTIONS
Theme: meaning in phrases
Word/phrase: best thing

TASK 8: MEANING FLAVOUR
Theme: co-selection
Word/phrase: incur

TASK 9: EXTENSIONS OF GRAMMER
Theme: grammar and lexis
Word/phrase: borders on

TASK 10: MEANING AND CONTEXT
Theme: meaning in proximity
Word/phrase: lap

LEVEL 3:

TASK 11: WORDS DIFFICULT TO DEFINE
Theme: lexical item
Word/phrase: budge

TASK 12: AD HOC MEANING
Theme: meaning in proximity
Word/phrase: veritable

TASK 13: GRAMMATICAL FRAMES
Theme: regularity and variation
Word/phrase: about as

TASK 14: HIDDEN MEANINGS
Theme: semantic prosody
Word/phrase: happen

LEVEL 4:

TASK 15: CLOSELY RELATED MEANINGS
Theme: meaning distinction
Word/phrase: manage

TASK 16: ONE AND ONE IS NOT EXACTLY TWO
Theme: lexical item
Word/phrase: true feelings

TASK 17: COMMON WORDS
Theme: meaning in phrases
Word/phrase: place

TASK 18: SINGLUAR AND PLURAL
Theme: grammar and lexis
Word/phrase: eye/clock

Glossary

Back Cover

Until recently students of language had to rely on what they could see or hear. Since the average individual encounters over 100,000 words every day the amount of text they experienced was much greater than they could recall at any one moment.

The advent of the electronic corpus changed all that. Now hundreds of millions of words can be read by a computer in a few seconds, and an increasing range of questions can be asked from an automatic source.

The result is a transformation of our understanding of language, and a major change in the methods used in language study.

The key skill in this new utopia is to be able to interrogate the corpus efficiently - to ask the right sort of questions, to refine the first responses and to control the retrieval process so as to reveal the way in which meaning and pattern interact in text. Much of this skill comes just from experience, and this book is the first step in acquiring the experience.

This book has specifically been written as a textbook for people who want to find out how to use a corpus in language work. It is written in a non-technical way and offers tasks in a step-by-step presentation.

John Sinclair is now President of the Tuscan Word Centre, after many years as Professor of Modern English Language at the University of Birmingham.

Author

John Sinclair is Professor of Modern English Language in the School of English and Corpus Linguistics at the University of Birmingham.