The Mongols and the West:1221-1410

Reihe
Longman
Autor
Peter Jackson  
Verlag
Pearson Longman
Einband
Softcover
Auflage
1
Sprache
Englisch
Seiten
448
Erschienen
April 2005
ISBN13
9780582368965
ISBN
0582368960
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Description

The Mongols had a huge impact on medieval Europe and the Islamic world.  This book provides a comprehensive survey of contacts between the Catholic West and the Mongol world-empire from the first appearance of Chinggis Khan's armies in 1221 down to the death of Tamerlane (1405) and the battle of Tannenberg (1410).

This book considers the Mongols as allies as well as conquerors; the perception of them in the West; the papal response to the threat (and opportunity) they presented;  the fate of the Frankish principalities in the Holy Land in the path of the Mongol onslaught; Western European embassies and missions to the East; and the impact of the Mongols on the expanding world view of the maturing Middle Ages.

For courses in crusading history and medieval European history.

Features

  • Reassesses relations between the Catholic West and the Mongols from the thirteenth to the fifteenth centuries
  • Assesses the impact of Mongol-Western contacts on the West's knowledge of the world down to the voyages of Columbus and Cabot
  • Provides a close study of relations with the Golden Horde in Eastern Europe down to the early 15th century
  • Investigates Western dealings with Temur (Tamerlane), the last 'Mongol' (or Tartar) conqueror to figure as a potential ally against the Muslims
  • Surveys Western European commercial operations in the Mongol world

Table of Contents

Preface

Abbreviations

Note on transliteration

Note on proper names

Note on references

List of maps

Introduction

1. Latin Christendom and its neighbours in the early thirteenth century

2. A world-empire in the making          

3. The Mongol invasions of 1241-1244           

4. A remedy against the Tartars        

5. The halting of the Mongol advance         

6. Images of the enemy           

7. An ally against Islam: the Mongols in the Near East   

8. From confrontation to coexistence: the Golden Horde   

9. Temür (Tamerlane) and Latin Christendom         

10. Mission to the infidel         

11. Traders and adventurers         

12. A new world discovered?         

Conclusion              

Appendix I: The authenticity of Marco Polo’s book     

Appendix II: Glossary           

Appendix III: Genealogical tables and lists of rulers      

Bibliography               

Index

Back Cover

In the thirteenth century, a dynamic and expansive Catholic Christendom, which had been free of major attack from its steppe frontier for over two hundred years, was confronted by a new and alien power in the shape of the vast empire of the advancing Mongols.

 

Despite the devastation of Hungary and Poland in 1241-2 and ongoing hostilities in Eastern Europe, the advent of the Mongols appeared to offer the West new opportunities.  Historically, the failure to exploit these opportunities - by not allying with the Mongols in the Near East against the Muslims, or by not converting the Mongols to Christianity - is usually blamed on the West.  This book demonstrates that such possibilities were illusory.

 

Written in a lively and accessible style, The Mongols and The West reassesses relations between the Catholic West and the Mongols from the first appearance of Chinggis Khan's armies on Europe's horizons in 1221 to the death of Temür or Tamerlane (1405) and the battle of Tannenberg (1410), across the spheres of diplomacy, missionary endeavour and trade.   In particular, it:

 

·         evaluates the impact of Mongol-Western contacts on the West's knowledge of the world through to the voyages of Columbus and Cabot

 

·         provides a close study of relations with the Golden Horde in Eastern Europe down to the early 15th century

 

·         investigates Western dealings with Temür, the last 'Mongol' conqueror to figure as a potential ally against the Muslims

 

·         re-examines the failure of the Catholic missionaries to win over the Mongols to Christianity

 

Peter Jackson is Professor of Medieval History at Keele University. He is editor of The Cambridge History of Iran, vol. 6: The Timurid and Safavid Periods (1986); translator and joint editor of The Mission of Friar William of Rubruck (1990); author of The Delhi Sultanate: a political and military history (1999) and of numerous articles on the Mongols, the Crusades and the eastern Islamic world in the Middle Ages.

Author

Peter Jackson is Professor of History, University of Keele and author of many books, including 'The Delhi Sultanate: A Political and Military History' (CUP 1999).

Reader Review(s)

"...an excellent addition to a distinguished series."

"...a work of careful scholarship and of well sustained arguments which challenge received opinions about the Mongol impact on Europe. I enjoyed reading it immensely, and recommend it unreservedly."

Bernard Hamilton - JRAS, Series 3 - Volume 15/3 - 2005

 

"Professor Peter Jackson's breadth of reading is admirable and his exact notes are full of precious information about sources and secondary literature. His command of languages is breathtaking, including as it does Persian, Polish and Hungarian."

"It is both a scholarly study and a profound and useful handbook for specialists, and, as such, this clearly written book will be read all over the world. It would also be suitable for a university course book"

Antti Ruotsala - Institute of Historical Research review, April 2006