Introduction to Jazz History

Series
Prentice Hall
Author
Donald D. Megill / Richard S. Demory  
Publisher
Pearson
Cover
Softcover
Edition
6
Language
English
Total pages
368
Pub.-date
June 2003
ISBN13
9780131829206
ISBN
0131829203
Related Titles



Description

For courses in Introduction to Jazz and Jazz History.

Widely adopted for its well-balanced approach this classic chronological survey of jazz history brings the various historical styles to life by exploring them through the lives of the musicians and a study of their recordings.

Features

  • NEW - Updated content throughout-Includes coverage of the ongoing stylistic trends in jazz today-the modern big bands; piano styles; bebop; and crossover.
    • Highlights the new extension of performers in the “new roots of jazz,” as well as many of the performers who have passed away.

  • NEW - Added biographical sketches-For recent and historical musicians. The biographies define the cultural elements which surround the musicians and the music-and focus on performers who stand out as leaders in the development of a particular jazz style.
    • Helps students understand the influence of cultural context on musical style.

  • NEW - Expanded collection of unique Listening Guides (for a total of 70)-(Now includes several Listening Guides for selections from SCCJ where appropriate, at the end of each part of the text.) Each discussion of a stylistic period is accompanied by timed Listening Guides to specific performances, drawn from the readily available Smithsonian Collection of Classic Jazz (SCCJ) and from the recordings that accompany the text.
    • Helps students discipline their listening and leaves professors free to help students draw their own aesthetic conclusions from the music. The Guides have been designed primarily to help students at any level discipline their listening.

  • NEW - Expanded supplemental appendix to the chapter on rock-Rock to Fusion: An Overview.
    • Provides students with a better understanding of rock's influence on contemporary jazz styles.

  • Coverage of all historical periods-From early blues and worksongs to contemporary performers such as Michael Brecker, New York Voices and Bela Fleck and the Flecktones.
    • Students see the influence of the early roots of jazz.

  • A focus on the chronology of jazz styles-And how they have influenced one another.
    • Shows the interaction of one jazz style on another.

  • Additional short, boxed biographies-Appear within the flow of the discussion. These biographies relate to the topic, but not directly to the specific subject.
    • Provides students with background information without interrupting the flow of the discussion.

  • A provocative essay on Jazz and the Creative Spirit.
    • Helps students address some of the questions which surround jazz and creativity.

  • The Elements of Music for the Nonmusician-A supplemental appendix that explains the necessary rudiments of music to students who have little or no music background.
    • Gets students up to speed quickly on the essentials so they can concentrate meaningfully on the discussions.

  • The Elements of Jazz-A supplemental appendix that presents specific musical elements in jazz and illustrates them with several examples.
    • Helps students clearly differentiate among the various jazz elements.

  • Coverage of the new hybrids of American music.
    • Focuses on the diversity of musical influences in America.

  • Chapter-end discographies.
    • Encourages students to expand their listening experiences and provides them with a convenient guide for locating specific sources.

  • Flexibility.
    • Chapter organization allows instructors to include additional biographies and recordings as desired; or to schedule short-term classes by using only the first chapters of each part for class discussion.

  • Glossary-Glossary terms are printed in bold type at least once in the text for easy identification, and are readily found again in the extensive glossary at the back of the book.
    • Provides students with a convenient tool to help them read with meaning.

  • Two student CDs-Offers a balanced overview of recordings that illustrate the stylistic periods.
    • Enables instructors to make listening assignments knowing that the recorded examples are immediately accessible-i.e., in the Smithsonian collection and the student collection. Supplies studentswith more contemporary examples to have after the course is finished.

  • Available as a fully loaded jazz history course for teaching online-Uses the text, the CDs, and the course management software ETUDES (Easy To Use Distant Education Software). This course has assignments and tests based on the text-all ready to use. Instructors simply enter the students into the online software and set the dates of the assignments and tests. All materials in ETUDES are open to additional material by the instructor and modification of what is already present. For more information on ETUDES contact the author at ddmegill@mcc.miracosta.edu.
    • Provides instructors with exceptional flexibility in extending course offerings.

  • Fully interactive Listening Guides-Using the CDPro plug-in, students can access the Listening Guides for the two-CD series that accompany the text. (These are also available on the web and can be used for classroom demonstration.) The interactive Listening Guides and an explanation on the necessary plug-in are found on the author's homepage: www.miracosta.edu/home/ddmegill
    • This software allows students to move anywhere in the listening example with just a mouse click on the description. There is additional background material on both the performer and the music and an interactive glossary.

New to this Edition

  • Updated content throughout-Includes coverage of the ongoing stylistic trends in jazz today-the modern big bands; piano styles; bebop; and crossover.
    • Highlights the new extension of performers in the “new roots of jazz,” as well as many of the performers who have passed away.

  • Added biographical sketches-For recent and historical musicians. The biographies define the cultural elements which surround the musicians and the music-and focus on performers who stand out as leaders in the development of a particular jazz style.
    • Helps students understand the influence of cultural context on musical style.

  • Expanded collection of unique Listening Guides (for a total of 70)-(Now includes several Listening Guides for selections from SCCJ where appropriate, at the end of each part of the text.) Each discussion of a stylistic period is accompanied by timed Listening Guides to specific performances, drawn from the readily available Smithsonian Collection of Classic Jazz (SCCJ) and from the recordings that accompany the text.
    • Helps students discipline their listening and leaves professors free to help students draw their own aesthetic conclusions from the music. The Guides have been designed primarily to help students at any level discipline their listening.

  • Expanded supplemental appendix to the chapter on rock-Rock to Fusion: An Overview.
    • Provides students with a better understanding of rock's influence on contemporary jazz styles.

Table of Contents



 1. The Roots of Jazz.


 2. Work Songs: Huddie Ledbetter-“Leadbelly.”

I. THE BLUES-1900- .

 3. Country Blues: Robert Johnson.
 4. City Blues: Bessie Smith.
 5. The Blues Continues: Muddy Waters, B. B. King, Eric Clapton, and Robert Cray.

II. PIANO STYLES-1890-1940.

 6. Ragtime: Scott Joplin.
 7. Stride: James P. Johnson and Fats Waller.
 8. Boogie-Woogie: Jimmy Yancey and Meade “Lux” Lewis.
 9. Piano Styles in Transition: “Fatha” Hines, Art Tatum, and Erroll Garner.

III. NEW ORLEANS JAZZ AND DIXIELAND-1910-1940.

 10. New Orleans Dixieland: Joe “King” Oliver.
 11. The Move to Chicago: Louis Armstrong and Bix Beiderbecke.
 12. Jelly Roll Morton.
 13. Leading Dixieland Soloists.

IV. SWING-1934-1945.

 14. Swing: Benny Goodman and Fletcher Henderson.
 15. Duke Ellington.
 16. Count Basie, Billie Holiday, and Lester Young.
 17. Swing in Transition.

V. BEBOP-1943-1960.

 18. The Bebop Revolution: Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie.
 19. Bebop Piano: Thelonious Monk and Bud Powell.
 20. Hard Bop (Straight Ahead and Funky).
 21. Bebop: In the Mainstream Today.

VI. THIRD STREAM, COOL, AND BEYOND-1949- .

 22. Third Stream and Avant-Garde: Miles Davis and Bill Evans.
 23. Charles Mingus and the Modern Jazz Quartet.
 24. Big Bands Continue.

VII. FREE JAZZ-1960- .

 25. Free Jazz: Ornette Coleman.
 26. John Coltrane and Eric Dolphy.
 27. Anthony Braxton and Cecil Taylor.

VIII. JAZZ/ROCK FUSION-1968- .

 28. Fusion: Chick Corea.
 29. Fusion to Crossover.
Epilogue: Jazz in Action.
An Essay on Jazz and the Creative Spirit.
Appendix A: The Elements of Music for the Nonmusician.
Appendix B: The Elements of Jazz.
Appendix C: Rock to Fusion: An Overview.
Glossary.
Bibliography.
Discography.
Index.

GUIDE TO THE RECORDINGS.

Leadbelly, Julie Ann Johnson.
R. Johnson, Hellhound On My Trail.
R. Cray, Labor of Love.
A. Tatum, Sophisticated Lady.
L. Armstrong, West End Blues.
B. Beiderbecke, Somebody Stole My Gal.
B. Goodman, Lets Dance.
E. Hines, 57 Varieties.
C. Parker, Koko.
Jazz Messengers.
A. Blakey
W. Marsalis, E.T.A..
B. McFerrin, Another Night in Tunisia.
M. Davis, Miles Runs the Voodoo Down.
C. Mingus, Fables of Faubus.
S. Kenton, Artistry in Rhythm.
B. Mintzer, The Ring.
J. Coltrane, My Favorite Things.
E. Dolphy, Oleo.
World Saxophone, Steppin Quartet.
Return to Forever, Musicmagic.
Weather Report, Port of Entry.
M. Brecker, Itsbynne ReeL.
New York Voices, Round Midnight.

Back Cover

Unlike other musical genres, jazz history is firmly connected to its great performers. They are the ones who create the complexities and individual nuances that make jazz so difficult to categorize and chronicle. Including pertinent biographical information, Introduction to Jazz History continues to examine this interaction between musicians, their history, and the history of their music.

The Sixth Edition updates current and ongoing stylistic trends in jazz, including the modern big bands and the new hybrids of jazz extending beyond fusion and crossover. The chronological presentation of the history is intuitive and logical. New biographical sketches for recent and historical musicians have been added to update the text.

Interactive Listening Guides are now available using the CDs that accompany the text and the CDs for SCCJ (Smithsonian Collection of Classic Jazz). Together, these two sets comprise the most powerful collection of jazz recordings available in such a simple package and they are now fully interactive. A fully developed online course of Jazz History using this textbook is now available. For information go to www.eMegill.com