Human Sexuality (Cloth)

Series
Pearson
Author
Roger R. Hock  
Publisher
Pearson
Cover
Softcover
Edition
4
Language
English
Total pages
704
Pub.-date
January 2015
ISBN13
9780133971385
ISBN
0133971384
Related Titles



Description

For courses in Human Sexuality

Help each student develop a sexual philosophy based on choice, awareness, and responsibility
Human Sexuality presents a relatable overview of the discipline that inspires students to think critically about the sexual world and their place in it. By taking an interpersonal approach and encouraging each student to develop a personal sexual philosophy, author Roger Hock helps students connect the material covered to their real-life decisions and behaviors, boosting engagement with the course. Sensitivity to diverse groups — not only in terms of race and ethnicity, but also in terms of sexual orientation, age, sexual knowledge, and sexual experience — allows all students to feel as comfortable and open about sexual topics as possible. The Fourth Edition includes updated data as well as coverage of contemporary issues that dominate today's headlines to ensure currency and relevancy.

Also available with MyPsychLab®
MyPsychLab for the Human Sexuality course extends learning online to engage students and improve results. Media resources with assignments bring concepts to life, and offer students opportunities to practice applying what they’ve learned. Please note: this version of MyPsychLab does not include an eText.

Human Sexuality, Fourth Edition is also available via REVEL™, an immersive learning experience designed for the way today's students read, think, and learn. Learn more.

Features

Choice: Help students learn how to make their own informed decisions
Packed with content that is relevant and meaningful, Human Sexuality offers the information students need to make the right choices and decisions in their own lives.
Since You Asked features at the beginning of each chapter present a list of student questions gathered from author Roger Hock’s human sexuality classes. Each question is referenced to a page number in the chapter where the answer and discussion of the issue may be found.

Focus on Your Feelings features early in each chapter alert students to the fact that unexpected emotions and/or reactions to provocative topics – such as sexual violence, sexually transmitted infections, and pornography – are normal and expected. This feature reassures each student that these feelings are normal, and that she is not the only one feeling them.

Self-Discovery features offer each student opportunities to learn about herself as a unique sexual person. The Self-Discoveries may contain information to help students become better informed about their sexual bodies, or better understand their relationships with others, or appreciate the rich variations of human sexuality.

Your Sexual Philosophy features offer students opportunities to develop their own personal sexual philosophies by considering how the material in each chapter may relate to their own lives.

• A running theme throughout the book is that sex is far more than heterosexual intercourse. This idea, indicated by a small symbol and reminder box in nearly every chapter, is intended to remind students that a wide range of sexual activities in addition to, or instead of, intercourse can offer sexual intimacy and satisfaction without engaging in risky or unwanted behaviors.
Awareness: Boost student awareness of health, and of the diversity of the sexual world
Learning to respect and appreciate the fascinating range of human diversity enhances students’ understanding of the complex sexual world around us, and how and where we each fit into it.
In Touch with Your Sexual Health features increase student awareness of sexual health issues. These features discuss topics such as sexual infections and diseases, problems in the functioning of the sexual body, or sexual issues that may cause psychological difficulties or emotional pain.

Sexuality and Culture features focus on topics from diverse cultural practices and customs, highlighting the fact that the world of human sexuality is rich in cultural, subcultural, and ethnic diversity.
Responsibility: Foster the knowledge students need to lead an informed and ethical life
Human Sexuality provides students with the skills to evaluate the vast amount of sexual information they receive from the media, from friends and acquaintances, and from their families.
Sexuality, Ethics, and the Law features boost awareness of issues of ethics and the law, which are often an important part of discussions of sexuality. Examples of some issues discussed include the ethics of informing potential intimate partners about sexually transmitted infections, the ethical consideration of sex-preselection in childbirth, Megan’s Law and sex offenders, and the crime of child pornography.

Historical Perspectives features highlight significant people or events, and provide key information about the history of the study of human sexuality.

Evaluating Sexual Research features shed some light on how students can critically analyze sexual stories and research they may come across in newspapers, magazines, online, or on TV. These features help students become more skilled consumers of sexual research findings by learning to evaluate sexual research before accepting what that see or read as fact.

Have You Considered? questions at the end of each chapter help students understand the material in the chapter, and encourage students to consider and analyze what they’ve learned, what the information means to them personally, and how it can be applied their own lives.
Ensure currency and maximize engagement with updated data and contemporary topics
The fourth edition reflects recent changes in the field to ensure that the material is as current as possible, and keeps students up-to-date on the research and historical events that compose the field of human sexuality.
NEW! Over 450 new and updated references reflect the latest discoveries and research in the field.

UPDATED! Statistics throughout the text have been revised and updated to those most recently available. These include, but are not limited to, statistics relating to contraception, sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy and birth, sexual orientation, sexual aggression (domestic violence, rape, child sexual abuse, and sexual harassment), prostitution, and pornography.

UPDATED! A text-wide update to the diagnostic criteria in the American Psychiatric Association’s 2013 revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (The DSM-5) ensures currency. This updated information is especially relevant to the text’s coverage of sexual problems (Chapter 7) and paraphilias (Chapter 14).

UPDATED! Updates of photos, drawings, graphs, figures, and other art maintain text freshness.

NEW! A greater inclusion and integration of sexual diversity throughout the text, and an enhanced emphasis on consent as it relates to all sexuality discussions and activities, reflect issues that dominate today's headlines.

NEW! The addition of topical, current-event items engages students in learning, and helps them relate course material to their lives.

NEW! Newly added learning objectives and review questions in all chapter sections guide students as they work through the text.
Also available with MyPsychLab®
MyPsychLab for the Human Sexuality course extends learning online to engage students and improve results. Media resources with assignments bring concepts to life, and offer students opportunities to practice applying what they’ve learned. Please note: this version of MyPsychLab does not include an eText.
•  Current, comprehensive, and cutting edge, the MyPsychLab Video Series takes the viewer from the research lab to inside the brain to out on the street for real-world applications. Six segments spanning a variety of interesting topics are included for each chapter.

Writing Space provides everything you need to foster better writing, all in one place. It's a single place to create, track, and grade writing assignments, provide writing resources, and exchange meaningful, personalized feedback with students, quickly and easily. The availability of auto-graded, assisted-graded, and create-your-own assignments within Writing Space lets you decide your level of involvement in evaluating your students' work. The auto-graded option allows you to assign writing in large classes without the burden of having to grade all student work by hand. And thanks to integration with Turnitin®, Writing Space can check students’ work for improper citation or plagiarism.

Learning Catalytics™ is an interactive, student response tool that uses students’ smartphones, tablets, or laptops to engage them in more sophisticated tasks and thinking. Now included with MyLab & Mastering with eText, Learning Catalytics enables you to generate classroom discussion, guide your lecture, and promote peer-to-peer learning with real-time analytics. Instructors, you can:
• Pose a variety of open-ended questions that help your students develop critical thinking skills.
• Monitor responses to find out where students are struggling.
• Use real-time data to adjust your instructional strategy and try other ways of engaging your students during class.
• Manage student interactions by automatically grouping students for discussion, teamwork, and peer-to-peer learning.

Media assignments for each chapter – including videos with assignable questions – feed directly into the gradebook, enabling instructors to track student progress automatically.

Human Sexuality, Fourth Edition is also available via REVEL™, an immersive learning experience designed for the way today's students read, think, and learn. Learn more.

New to this Edition

Human Sexuality, Fourth Edition is also available via REVEL™, an immersive learning experience designed for the way today's students read, think, and learn. Learn more.


I. New and Updated Features

Ensure currency and maximize engagement with updated data and contemporary topics
The fourth edition reflects recent changes in the field to ensure that the material is as current as possible, and keeps students up-to-date on the research and historical events that compose the field of human sexuality.
Over 450 new and updated references reflect the latest discoveries and research in the field.

UPDATED! Statistics throughout the text have been revised and updated to those most recently available. These include, but are not limited to, statistics relating to contraception, sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy and birth, sexual orientation, sexual aggression (domestic violence, rape, child sexual abuse, and sexual harassment), prostitution, and pornography.

UPDATED! A text-wide update to the diagnostic criteria in the American Psychiatric Association’s 2013 revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (The DSM-5) ensures currency. This updated information is especially relevant to the text’s coverage of sexual problems (Chapter 7) and paraphilias (Chapter 14).

UPDATED! Updates of photos, drawings, graphs, figures, and other art maintain text freshness.

A greater inclusion and integration of sexual diversity throughout the text, and an enhanced emphasis on consent as it relates to all sexuality discussions and activities, reflect issues that dominate today's headlines.

The addition of topical, current-event items engages students in learning, and helps them relate course material to their lives.

Newly added learning objectives and review questions in all chapter sections guide students as they work through the text.
II. Content Updates

Chapter 1: Studying Human Sexuality
• New “Sexuality and Culture” feature highlighting recent changes in sex education in China
• Enhanced emphasis on the issue of consent in all aspects of sexual education, research, and activities
• A new “In Touch with Your Sexual Health” feature clarifying the main categories of relevant health issues, including physical, emotional, and psychological problems
• Topical addition: New “Evaluating Sexual Research” critical-thinking feature: “How could this Happen? Father Who Went to Hospital for Kidney Stones Discovers He Is a Woman”

Chapter 2: Sexual Anatomy
• Updated discussion of current controversy surrounding male circumcision
• Newly updated maps, statistics, and discussion on
current global status of female genital mutilation
• Latest information concerning urinary tract infections and development of E. coli vaccine which will prevent most UTIs
• Most current guidelines on mammograms, breast self-examination, and breast health recommendations
• DSM-5 update on premenstrual dysphoric disorder diagnostics

Chapter 3: The Physiology of Sexual Response
• Modified conceptualizations of Masters and Johnson’s model of sexual response: merging excitement and plateau phases
• Greater emphasis on alternatives to Masters and Johnson model of sexual response
• Updates on G-spot and female ejaculation discussions
• Addition of Janssen and Bancroft’s “Dual Control Theory” of sexual response
• Topical addition: Reference to the new cable TV bio-pic series, “The Masters of Sex,” dramatizing the careers and discoveries of William Masters and Virginia Johnson
• Revision of the “New View” approach to female sexual response

Chapter 4: Intimate Relationships
• Increased coverage and integration of all sexual orientations throughout chapter
• Added discussion of information technology and social networking as they relate to trust and control in relationships (“cyberspying”)
• Increased emphasis on relationship abuse in gay and lesbian relationships
• New “power and control” wheel applied to non-heterosexual relationships

Chapter 5: Contraception: Planning and Preventing
• New visual conceptualization of contraception types based on overall effectiveness
• Latest research on Cowper’s gland secretions, sperm cells, and the withdrawal method of contraception
• Topical addition: Legal bans and confiscation of condoms in some countries attempting to reduce sex trade activity
• Efforts to reinvent the condom to increase acceptability: Development of “origami condom” and The Gates Foundation condom-design competition
• Latest research suggesting reduced hormonal contraceptive effectiveness with increased body weight
• Latest, specific guidelines for missed contraceptive pills
• New reversible contraceptive IUD: Skyla
• Greater detail on reasons for vasectomy failure

Chapter 6: Sexual Behaviors: Experiencing Sexual Pleasure
• New discussion of interplay of cybersex and sexual fantasy
• New research on kissing as erotic activity
• Recent data from National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior (NSSHB) incorporated throughout chapter

Chapter 7: Sexual Problems and Solutions
• Chapter significantly revised to reflect DSM-5 diagnostic guidelines including:
• Sexual disorders now divided into: Sexual desire, interest, or arousal disorders; disorders of orgasm; and sexual pain disorders
• Diagnosis of sexual disorders requires duration of problem for a minimum of six months and is causing significant psychological or emotional distress
• Disorders less focused on heterosexual intercourse
• Dyspareunia and vaginismus diagnoses eliminated and combined into genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPPPD)
• Disorders now classified as lifelong versus acquired and/or generalized versus situational

Chapter 8: Sexually Transmitted Infections/Diseases
• Updated statistics on incidence and prevalence worldwide
• Greater emphasis on problem of the asymptomatic nature of most STIs
• Current cervical cancer prevention guidelines, including recommendations for HPV (genital warts) screenings
• Role of HPV in anal and oral cancers and recommendation for HPV vaccine for boys as well as girls
• Revised and greater detail of HIV pandemic globally and by region, including some new, optimistic downward trends
• Added discussion of HIV2
• New CDC recommendation for use of antiretroviral medication, Truvada, to help prevent transmission of virus

Chapter 9: Conception, Pregnancy, and Birth
• Enhanced discussion to clarify distinction between conception and pregnancy
• Detailed discussion of tobacco smoke as teratogen, including secondhand absorption, leading to higher rates of ectopic pregnancy, miscarriage, preterm births, and stillbirths
• New DNA-based blood test to determine sex of embryo at 7 weeks gestation (and how this relates to sex-selection debate)
• Update on high C-section rates and surrounding medical debate
• Discussion of state-level legal challenges to Roe v. Wade over past decade
• Expanded discussion of abortion issues

Chapter 10: Gender: Expectations, Roles, and Behaviors
• Terminology change from “intersex” to “Disorders of Gender Development” as specified by the DSM-5
• Addition of detailed criteria for medical approval of gender reassignment surgery
• Enhanced discussion of transgender children and possible medical interventions to forestall puberty
• Topical addition: California’s 2013 law requiring public schools to allow students to adopt their self-identified gender identity, participate in sports and other activities accordingly, and use the restroom and other facilities aligning with their gender identity
• Extended discussion of gender-linked aggression to include social alienation as a form of aggression in girls
• Clarification of the “overlapping curve model” of gender differences

Chapter 11: Sexual Orientation
• Updates of same-sex marriage laws as recently as possible up to press time
• Recent updates of American Psychological Association’s position statements on sexual orientation
• Revised discussion of legal status of homosexuality in various countries
• Topical addition: Uganda’s 2014 law imposing a 14-year prison sentence for first-time offenders engaging in “homosexual acts”
• Recent research on the erroneous, yet wide acceptance, of a “gay gene” theory
• Addition of research showing anti-gay bias by students toward instructors
• Update on hate crime statistics based on sexual orientation from 2009 to present

Chapter 12: Sexual Development Throughout Life
• Update on what constitutes troubling or problematic sexual behavior in young children
• “Final word” on comprehensive sex education versus abstinence-only programs
• Addition of new statistics on teen dating violence
• Inclusion of schools’ efforts to create more open, accepting, and safe environments for teens who are gay, lesbian, transgender, or questioning their gender identity or sexual orientation
• Information on protecting teens from dangers of cybersex
• Addition of new data on teen condom use
• New trends in cohabitation

Chapter 13: Sexual Aggression and Violence: Rape, Child Sexual Abuse, and Sexual Harassment
• Greater focus on central issue of consent for any type of sexually related behavior
• Addition of feature on sexual violence in the military
• Discussion of new, broader FBI definition of rape that includes more forms of penetration and includes rape of men
• Cultural comparisons of child sexual abuse rates
• Addition of self-evaluation instrument for victims of predator (date-rape) drugs
• Discussion of “cyberharassment”

Chapter 14: Paraphilic Disorders: Atypical Sexual Behaviors
• Full chapter revision reflecting DSM-5 changes in clinical criteria of paraphilia diagnoses
• Distinction between a “paraphilia” and a “paraphilic disorder”
• Addition that non-victimizing paraphilia diagnosis must involve “personal distress”
• Explanation that for victimizing paraphilias, simple desire for paraphilic behavior is adequate for diagnosis
• Explanation that “sexual addiction” is not deemed a paraphilia; classified as “hypersexual disorder”
• Update on medication therapy for paraphilias, especially SSRIs

Chapter 15: The Sexual Marketplace: Prostitution and Pornography
• Updates on issue of legalization or decriminalization of prostitution
• Topical addition: Attempts to add male sex workers in Nevada brothels (to service women customers)
• Discussion of effectiveness (or lack thereof) of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act (VTVPA) of 2000
• Updated statistics on crack cocaine use among sex trade workers (estimates up to 95%)
• Addition of new “Sexuality, Ethics, and the Law” feature on the use of “john school” to reduce demand for prostitution
• Discussion of the effects of pornography on intimate relationships
• Update of battle against child pornography on a global scale
• New efforts to consolidate sexually explicit sites under .xxx top-level domain
• Discussion of major Internet providers’ (i.e. Google) efforts to remove child abuse sites from World Wide Web

Table of Contents

1. Studying Human Sexuality
2. Sexual Anatomy
3. The Physiology of Sexual Response
4. Intimate Relationships
5. Contraception: Planning and Preventing
6. Sexual Behaviors: Experiencing Sexual Pleasure
7. Sexual Problems and Solutions
8. Sexually Transmitted Infections/Diseases
9. Conception, Pregnancy, and Birth
10. Gender: Expectations, Roles, and Behaviors
11. Sexual Orientation
12. Sexual Development Throughout Life
13. Sexual Aggression and Violence: Rape, Child Sexual Abuse, and Sexual Harassment
14. Paraphilic Disorders: Atypical Sexual Behaviors
15. The Sexual Marketplace: Prostitution and Pornography

Author

Roger R. Hock, PhD, is a professor of psychology and human sexuality at Mendocino College in northern California. He received his MA in Psychology from San Diego State University and his PhD in Psychology from the University of California at San Diego. He is also the author of Forty Studies that Changed Psychology: Explorations into the History of Psychological Research (Pearson, 2012) and coauthor (with Meg Kennedy Dugan) of It’s My Life Now: Starting over after an Abusive Relationship or Domestic Violence (Routledge, 2006), and (with Amy Marin) Psychology, a digital introductory psychology textbook from Pearson Education.

Dr. Hock has been teaching psychology and human sexuality for over twenty-five years. Human Sexuality is his favorite class to teach and is consistently one of the most popular among students. He believes that Human Sexuality is an essential course for college students because the topics covered are fundamental to our lives and our identities as humans. He asserts that the Human Sexuality course should be a requirement for all undergraduate college and university students. Why? Because the material in this course touches everyone, in countless ways, throughout their lives. But, more importantly, students, upon entering college as adults, often lack a complete and current understanding of at least some, if not many, key issues that combine to create the complexities of humans as sexual beings. Sex education in grades K—12 tends to be incomplete, inadequate, sometimes misleading, and too often, nonexistent. Moreover, not all parents are willing or able to impart the necessary and correct information to their children. Students in higher education clearly need and deserve the knowledge they acquire in this class.