Writing Fiction:A Guide to Narrative Craft: International Edition

Reihe
Addison-Wesley
Autor
Janet Burroway / Elizabeth Stuckey-French / Ned Stuckey-French
Verlag
Pearson
Einband
Softcover
Auflage
8
Sprache
Englisch
Seiten
432
Erschienen
Januar 2010
ISBN13
9780205792306
ISBN
0205792308
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Artikel Auflage Datum Preis SFr Verfügbar
9780321923165
Writing Fiction
9 April 2014 93.20

Description

The most widely used and respected text in its field, Writing Fiction, 8th edition guides the novice story writer from first inspiration to final revision.

 

A bestseller through seven editions, Writing Fiction explores the elements of fiction, providing practical writing techniques and concrete examples. Written in a tone that is personal and non-prescriptive, the text encourages students to develop proficiency through each step of the writing process, offering an abundance of exercises designed to spur writing and creativity.  The text also integrates diverse, contemporary short stories in the belief that the reading of inspiring fiction goes hand-in-hand with the writing of fresh and exciting stories.

Features

  • Accessible, student-friendly writing style is appealing as well as instructive; the writing is direct, informal, and engaging. 
  • A focus on the writing process from initial thought through final draft makes this a practical, easy-to-follow, guide to writing fiction.
  • Thorough and practical discussions of all the major fictional elements offer students a comprehensive guide to the craft of writing stories.  Topics include freewriting, plot, style, characterization, dialogue, time, place, imagery, and point of view.
  • Diverse and compelling short stories conclude chapters to model the fictional elements discussed in the text.
  • Useful, stimulating writing exercises at the end of each chapter spur student writing and creativity.
  • Quotations from established authors offer young writers words of advice, support, and inspiration.
  • Offering maximum flexibility, each chapter is self-contained, so instructors can teach the book in any order.
 

New to this Edition

  • New Selections.  More than half of the short stories included in the text are new to this edition, including works by established contemporary favorites such as Stuart Dybeck, Junot Diaz, Rob Hansen, Sherman Alexie, and many others. 
  • Short-Shorts.  A new attention to “short-shorts,” an ever-popular trend in contemporary American literary culture, has allowed us to now include three short stories at the end of every elements chapter.  
  • The Writing Workshop.  In response to reviewer requests, our coverage of the writing workshop has been expanded and moved into Chapter 1.  This new section will familiarize you students with the expectations and goals of this fundamental part of fiction writing courses.
  • Character and Dialogue.  We have reconceived our coverage of character by expanding our discussion of dialogue into a full chapter and reorganizing our discussion of methods of characterization into another full chapter in order to provide a more comprehensive discussion of both topics.
  • Comparison.   The chapter on Comparison has been condensed into the discussion of significant detail in Chapter 2 to provide a more straightforward, practical discussion useful to beginning writing students.
  • Theme.   The chapter on theme has been condensed and incorporated into our discussion of revision.  Working from the conviction that theme is developed through every element of fiction, by discussing it with revision we encourage beginning writers to focus on the story, allowing theme to develop through their use of particulars to create an experience of theme. 
  • Revision.  We have added an early draft of fiction writer Ron Carlson's story “Keith,” to accompany an essay he wrote about revising the story and a final draft of the story so that students can trace the evolution of a published piece.  

Table of Contents

*** indicate sections new to this edition.

 

Preface

 

1. Whatever Works: The Writing Process

Get Started

            Journal Keeping

            Freewriting

            Exercises

            The Computer

            The Critic: A Caution

            Choosing a Subject

Keep Going

A Word about Theme

Reading as Writers***

About the Writing Workshop***

            How Workshops Work***

            The Writer's Role***

Writing Exercises

 

2. Seeing is Believing: Showing and Telling

Significant Detail

            Writing about Emotion

            Filtering

            Comparison

Types of Metaphor and Simile***

            Metaphoric Faults to Avoid***

The Active Voice

Prose Rhythm

Mechanics

“We Didn't,” Stuart Dybeck***

“Big Me,” Dan Chaon

“The Red Fox Fur Coat,” Teolinda Gersao (Translated by Margaret Jull Costa)***

            Freewriting

            Exercises

            The Computer

            The Critic: A Caution

            Choosing a Subject

Keep Going

A Word about Theme

Reading as Writers***

About the Writing Workshop***

            How Workshops Work***

            The Writer's Role***

Writing Exercises

 

2. Seeing is Believing: Showing and Telling

Significant Detail

            Writing about Emotion

            Filtering

            Comparison

Types of Metaphor and Simile***

            Metaphoric Faults to Avoid***

The Active Voice

Prose Rhythm

Mechanics

“We Didn't,” Stuart Dybeck***

“Big Me,” Dan Chaon

“The Red Fox Fur Coat,” Teolinda Gersao (Translated by Margaret Jull Costa)***

Writing Exercises

 

3. Building Character: Dialogue

The Direct Methods of Character Presentation

Dialogue

            Summary, Indirect, and Direct Dialogue

            Economy in Dialogue

            Characterizing Dialogue

            Other Uses of Dialogue

            Dialogue as Action

            Text and Subtext

            “No” Dialogue

            Specificity

            Format and Style

            Vernacular

“Fiesta, 1980,” Junot Diaz***

“Every Tongue Shall Confess,” Z.Z. Packer***

“His Hand on my Restless Leg,” Pia Z. Ehrhardt***

Writing Exercises

 

4. The Flesh Made Word: Characterization, Part II

The Direct Methods of Character Presentation

            Appearance

            Action

            Thought

The Indirect Methods of Character Presentation  

 Authorial Interpretation

            Interpretation by Another Character

Conflict between Methods of Presentation

           The Universal Paradox

Credibility

Purpose

Complexity

Change
Reinventing Character
Creating a Group or Crowd

The Character Journal
Character: A Summary

 “Mule Killers,” Lydia Peelle***

Bullet in the Brain,” Tobias Wolff

Tandolfo the Great,” Richard Bausch

Writing Exercises

 

5. Far, Far Away: Fictional Place

Place and Atmosphere

Harmony and Conflict Between Character and Place

Place and Character
Place and Emotion

Symbolic and Suggestive Place
Alien and Familiar Place

An Exercise in Place

“The Sea Fairies,” Maura Stanton***

“Love and Hydrogen,” Jim Shepard

A Visit of Charity,” Eudora Welty

Writing Exercises

 

6. Long Ago: Fictional Time

Summary and Scene

Revising Summary and Scene

Flashback

Slow Motion

“Homonoids,” Jill McCorkle***

“Mrs. Dutta Writes a Letter,” Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

“Feelers,” John Gould***

Writing Exercises

 

7. The Tower and the Net: Story Form, Plot, and Structure

Conflict, Crisis, and Resolution

The Arc of the Story

Patterns of Power

Connection and Disconnection

Story Form as a Check Mark

Story and Plot

The Short Story and the Novel

“What You Pawn, I Will Redeem,” Sherman Alexie***

“My Kid's Dog,” Ron Hansen***

“Everything That Rises Must Converge,” Flannery O'Connor

Writing Exercises

 

8. Call Me Ishmael: Point of View

Who Speaks?

            Third Person

            Second Person

            First Person

To Whom?

            The Reader

            Another Character

            The Self

            Interior Monologue

            Stream of Consciousness

In What Form?

At What Distance?

Consistency: A Final Caution

“Missing Women,” June Spence***

 “Who's Irish?,” Gish Jen

“Reply All,” Robin Hemley***

Writing Exercises

 

9. Play It Again, Sam: Revision

Re-Vision

Worry It and Walk Away

Criticism and the Story Workshop

Asking the Big Question: “What Have I Written”

How Fictional Elements Contribute to Theme

Revision Questions

Further Suggestions for Revision

Examples of the Revision Process

“Notes on Keith” and early draft of “Keith,” Ron Carlson***

Final Draft of “Keith,” Ron Carlson

Writing Exercises

 

Appendix: Kinds of Fiction

Credits

Index

 

 

 

 

Author

JANET BURROWAY is the author of plays, poetry, essays, children's books, and eight novels including The Buzzards, Raw Silk (runner up for the National Book Award), Opening Nights, Cutting Stone, and Bridge of Sand. Her publications include a collection of personal essays, "Embalming Mom," in addition to a volume of poetry, Material Goods, and two children's books in verse, The Truck on the Track and The Giant Jam Sandwich . Her most recent plays, Medea with Child (The Reva Shiner Award), Sweepstakes, Division of Property (Arts & Letters Award), and Parts of Speech, have received readings and productions in NewYork, London, San Francisco, Hollywood, Chicago, and various regional theatres. Her textbook Writing Fiction, now in its eighth edition, is the most widely used creative writing text in the United States. She is Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor Emerita at the Florida State University in Tallahassee.


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