Psychology: Pearson New International Edition

Series
Pearson
Author
Saundra K. Ciccarelli / J. Noland White  
Publisher
Pearson
Cover
Softcover
Edition
2
Language
English
Total pages
596
Pub.-date
July 2013
ISBN13
9781292023175
ISBN
1292023171
Related Titles


Product detail

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9781292023175
Psychology: Pearson New International Edition
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Description

The most learner-centered and assessment-driven text available.

 

Praised for a very engaging writing style, comprehensive coverage of key research, and strong pedagogical features, Ciccarelli and White focus on getting students to read their textbook. Using the most recent recommended APA undergraduate psychology learning outcomes, the authors establish clear learning objectives for students that are tied to these objectives. Student and instructors praise Ciccarelli and White's approach to teaching and learning in today's classroom. The thirteen-chapter table of contents covers the essentials that every introductory psychology student should know and fits easily into a one-semester course.

 

A better teaching and learning experience

This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience– for you and your students. Here’s how:

  • Personalize Learning - The new MyPsychLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals.
  • Improve Critical Thinking – Features such as Student Voice and Link icons help students understand the material easily. The Student Voice Questions create a dialogue between the reader and the text while the Link icons connect all the related fields of psychology to one another.
  • Engage Students – The highly visual features such as chapter opening prologues, concept maps, and special feature essays are designed to capture student interest immediately.
  • Explore Research – With updated references, readers will continue to read about the most current research. Special feature essays found within the narrative cover interesting topics related to the chapter material.
  • Support Instructors – This program provide instructors with unbeatable resources, including state-of-the art Interactive PowerPoints embedded with videos, the NEW MyPsychLab Video Series, an easy to use Instructor’s Manual, a class tested Test Bank with item analysis data, an online test generator (MyTest) and the new MyPsychLab.

Features

THE MOST LEARNER-CENTERED AND ASSESSMENT-DRIVEN TEXT AVAILABLE.

  • The design of the book was carefully chosen with feedback from both instructors and students. From the stunning chapter openers, to the chapter ending visual Concept Summaries, the appeal of the design draws the reader in and keeps them engaged with the material.
  • Based on APA assessment guidelines, each chapter is organized around detailed learning objectives. All of the ancillary materials are also organized around these objectives, making the text a fully integrated system of study. Instructors can choose which objectives are important in their course and have the flexibility when using the ancillary material to pick the content they want their students to focus on.

PERSONALIZE LEARNING WITH MYPSYCHLAB

  • The new MyPsychLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals.
  • The Pearson eText allows students to access their textbook anytime, anywhere, and any way they want—including listening online or downloading to their iPad.
  • A personalized study plan for each student, based on Bloom’s Taxonomy, arranges content from less complex thinking—like remembering and understanding—to more complex critical thinking—like applying and analyzing. This layered approach promotes better critical-thinking skills, and helps students succeed in the course and beyond.
  • New MyPsychLab Video Series - This new video series offers the most current and cutting-edge introductory psychology video content. These exclusive half-hour videos take the viewer into today’s research laboratories, inside the body and brain, and onto the street to experience real-world applications.
  • Assessment tied to every video, application, and chapter enables both instructors and students to track progress and get immediate feedback. With results feeding into a powerful gradebook, the assessment program helps instructors identify student challenges early—and find the best resources with which to help students.
  • An assignment calendar allows instructors to assign graded activities, with specific deadlines, and measure student progress.
  • Class Prep collects the very best class presentation resources in one convenient online destination, so instructors can keep students engaged throughout every class.
  • The New Experiments Tool, found in MyPsychLab, allows students to experience psychology through online experiments that reinforce class lessons and textbook content.
  • A 3D Virtual Brain enables students to better visualize the workings of the brain. This hands-on experience engages students and helps make course content and terminology relevant. This learning application has assessments tied to it in order to make parts of it assignable to students.

IMPROVE CRITICAL THINKING

  • Designed to help students develop their critical thinking and communication skills, these Student Voice questions which appear in the margin and guide the narrative encourage, students to ask questions. Using conversational tone, which helps students relate to the concepts and keeps their interest, these questions represent the many student questions the authors have encountered in their own classroom.(ex. p. 19)
  • The LINK feature is a great resource for students who often struggle with seeing the “big picture” of psychology and how all the fields of psychology relate to one another. (ex. p. 26)
  • End-of-the-chapter “Concept Summaries” reinforce all the major objectives of the chapter. (ex. p. 34)

ENGAGE STUDENTS

  • Expanded “Psychology in Action” found in the introductory chapter focuses on study methods as well as strategies for improving the student’s memory. (ex. p. PIA-4)
  • Chapter Opening Prologues are designed to capture the imaginations of students and adds appeal to the chapter content. The material is taken from a recent case study or recent event in the news.(ex. p. 5)
  • ”Applying Psychology to Everyday Life” section found at the end of every chapter takes something from that chapter and relates it to the real world.(ex. p. 32)
  • “Practice Quiz: How Much Do You Remember?” and “Test Yourself” at the end of every chapter replicate the experience most students have with graded assessment. (ex. p. 32)
  • New “Study Tip” feature at the beginning of each chapter reminds students to refer back to “Psychology in Action” for helpful tips on effective study methods and strategies.(ex. p. 42)

EXPLORE RESEARCH

  • The New Experiments Tool, found in MyPsychLab, allows students to experience psychology through online experiments that reinforce class lessons and textbook content.
  • “Psychology in the News” and “Classic Research in Psychology” in each chapter cover interesting topics related to the chapter material, especially topics of diversity and cultural interest. This content is part of the narrative and therefore it is more likely that students will read the enriching material.(ex. p. 52)
  • Every chapter in the second edition has been updated with current and relevant research citations. Some highlights of the new and expanded coverage include:
    • Chapter 2 The Biological Perspective is reorganized. The section “Looking Inside the Living Brain” clearly presents information on cutting-edge techniques psychologists use to study the brain.(ex. p. 60)
    • Chapter 4 Learning is reorganized to improve sections on learned helplessness and the controversial effects of violent media on children are expanded.
    • Chapter 5 Memory includes a new opening essay featuring a man known as “The Human Google” with the rare ability to recall almost any event from his past.(ex. p. 163)
    • Chapter 12 Psychological Disorders has been restructured and now includes eating disorders and PTSD.
    • Chapter 13 Psychological Therapies includes new discussions on which therapies are the most effective for a variety of disorder.

SUPPORT INSTRUCTORS

  • Quality Test Bank: The Ciccarelli and White Test Item File includes three banks of questions–the primary bank of questions (over 2800 items), a secondary bank of questions (over 1500 questions) and a third bank of questions pulled from the practice tests in the text (over 500 questions). A key feature for the test bank is the inclusion of rationales for the correct answer and a key distracter in the multiple choice questions. The rationales help instructors evaluate the questions they are choosing for their tests and assess their quality. Instructors have the option to use the rationales as an answer key for their students. Questions include item analysis based on extensive class testing–something rarely found in other test banks and a key indicator for you of the quality of the questions in the bank.
  • Pearson MyTest a powerful assessment generation program that helps instructors easily create and print quizzes and exams. Questions and tests can be authored online, allowing instructors ultimate flexibility and the ability to efficiently manage assessments anytime, anywhere.
  • Revised most robust PowerPoint slide collection on the market–include simulations, activities, embedded video, and a highly visual presentation of the chapter material  The slides come with a guided walk through on best practices for using the slides, instructor notes and ready to use student handouts. A secondary set of PowerPoints provide a more “traditional” presentation of the chapter material.
  • Instructor’s Resource Manual (IRM) includes Lecture Guides for each chapter–using the chapter outlines to integrate the suggested lecture discussions, activities and other resources directly into the appropriate sections. In addition the Lecture Guides include brief notes synthesizing the key information for that section. The IRM includes hyperlinks, to easily jump to the section/page for review.
  • With new MyPsychLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals.
  • New Class Prep collects the very best class presentation resources in one convenient online destination, so instructors can keep students engaged throughout every class.
  • New MyPsychLab Video Series - This new video series offers the most current and cutting-edge introductory psychology video content. These exclusive half-hour videos take the viewer into today’s research laboratories, inside the body and brain, and onto the street to experience real-world applications.

New to this Edition

In this Section:

1. Overview of Changes

2. Chapter-by-Chapter Changes

1. Overview of Changes

 

PERSONALIZE LEARNING WITH MYPSYCHLAB

  • The new MyPsychLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals.
  • The Pearson eText allows students to access their textbook anytime, anywhere, and any way they want–including listening online or downloading to their iPad.
  • A personalized study plan for each student, based on Bloom’s Taxonomy, arranges content from less complex thinking–like remembering and understanding–to more complex critical thinking–like applying and analyzing. This layered approach promotes better critical-thinking skills, and helps students succeed in the course and beyond.
  • New MyPsychLab Video Series - This new video series offers the most current and cutting-edge introductory psychology video content. These exclusive half-hour videos take the viewer into today’s research laboratories, inside the body and brain, and onto the street to experience real-world applications.
  • Assessment tied to every video, application, and chapter enables both instructors and students to track progress and get immediate feedback. With results feeding into a powerful gradebook, the assessment program helps instructors identify student challenges early–and find the best resources with which to help students.
  • An assignment calendar allows instructors to assign graded activities, with specific deadlines, and measure student progress.
  • Class Prep collects the very best class presentation resources in one convenient online destination, so instructors can keep students engaged throughout every class.
  • The New Experiments Tool, found in MyPsychLab, allows students to experience psychology through online experiments that reinforce class lessons and textbook content.
  • A 3D Virtual Brain enables students to better visualize the workings of the brain. This hands-on experience engages students and helps make course content and terminology relevant. This learning application has assessments tied to it in order to make parts of it assignable to students.

ENGAGE STUDENTS

  • Expanded “Psychology in Action” found in the introductory chapter focuses on study methods as well as strategies for improving the student’s memory.(ex. p. PIA-1)
  • “Study Tip” feature at the beginning of each chapter reminds students to refer back to “Psychology in Action” about helpful tips on effective study methods and strategies.(ex. p. 164)

EXPLORE RESEARCH

  • The New Experiments Tool, found in MyPsychLab, allows students to experience psychology through online experiments that reinforce class lessons and textbook content.
  • Every chapter in the second edition has been updated with current and relevant research citations. Some highlights of the new and expanded coverage include:
    • Chapter 2 The Biological Perspective is reorganized. The section “Looking Inside the Living Brain” clearly present information on cutting-edge techniques psychologists use to study the brain. (ex. p. 60)
    • Chapter 4 Learning is reorganized to improve sections on learned helplessness and the effects of violent media on children are expanded.
    • Chapter 5 Memory includes a new opening essay featuring a man known as “The Human Google” with the rare ability to recall almost any event from his past. (ex. p. 163)
    • Chapter 12 Psychological Disorders has been restructured and now includes eating disorders and PTSD.
    • Chapter 13 Psychological Therapies includes new discussions on which therapies are the most effective for a variety of disorder.

SUPPORT INSTRUCTORS

  • The new MyPsychLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals.
  • New Class Prep collects the very best class presentation resources in one convenient online destination, so instructors can keep students engaged throughout every class.
  • New MyPsychLab Video Series - This new video series offers the most current and cutting-edge introductory psychology video content. These exclusive half-hour videos take the viewer into today’s research laboratories, inside the body and brain, and onto the street to experience real-world applications.

2. Chapter-by-Chapter Changes

 

Chapter 1:  The Science of Psychology

  • Some “Have you ever wondered…” questions revised.
  • New learning objective 1.12: “What are the basic elements of a real-world experiment?”
  • Condensed definition of psychology’s goals.
  • Revised example of a psychologist’s description.
  • Revised section describing explanation. Example replaced with Cheryan et al study (2009) of gender stereotypes in computer science education.
  • Cheryan study used as example of prediction and control.
  • Information on cognitive-behavioral therapy moved to Chapter Thirteen.
  • Material on women in psychology moved to Titchener and Structuralism section.
  • Material on Mary Whiton Calkins moved to William James and Functionalism section.
  • Material added on African Americans, including Francis Cecil Sumner, first African American to earn a Ph.D. in psychology (Guthrie, 2004); Kenneth and Mamie Clark, who researched effects of school segregation (Lal, 2002).
  • Also added, a description of psychologist Jorge Sanchez, who researched cultural bias in intelligence testing.
  • New Issues in Psychology Section: Psychology’s African American Roots. Includes Robert Guthrie’s book Even the Rat Was White. Six African American psychologists’ work summarized here.
  • Material on Mary Cover Jones moved to Pavlov, Watson, and the Dawn of Behaviorism section.
  • Behaviorism’s influence on cognitive psychology inserted.
  • Condensed material on Freud’s theory.
  • Link between neurobiology and psychodynamic concepts mentioned (Glucksman, 2006).
  • Humanistic Perspective section condensed.
  • Expansion ofBiopsychological Perspective, including what biopsychologists study; Puts, Jordan and Breedlove study (2006) on homosexuality; and Escandon, Al-Hammadi, and Galvin study (2010) on Alzheimer’s.
  • Section titled Types of Psychological Professions now Psychological Professionals and Areas of Specialization.
  • Condensed material on difference between a psychologist, psychiatrist, and social worker.
  • Section titled Psychology: The Science revised to Psychology: The Scientific Method.
  • The scientific method material refers to earlier content on goals of psychology.
  • New material on how to obtain random selection from a population.
  • Section on research experiments using Teresa Amabile research removed, replaced with aggression and children’s cartoons.
  • New example of a typical experiment in Issues in Psychotherapy: Stereotypes, Athletes, and College Test Performance (Jameson et al, 2007). 
  • Section titled The Criteria for Critical Thinking now Applying Psychology to Everyday Life: Thinking Critically About Critical Thinking.
  • Extended description of critical thinking criteria.

Chapter 2:  The Biological Perspective

  • New chapter prologue about Rick and Dick Hoyt, which deals with brain injuries and BCIs.
  • New Psychology in the News: Fact or Fiction: Focus on the Brain, But Check Your Sources.
  • Removal of Psychology in the News on stem cells. Stem cells material condensed and now in the section on the central nervous system.
  • Section on endocrine glands moved after The Peripheral Nervous System. Learning Objectives reordered accordingly.
  • New: Applying Psychology to Everyday Life: Paying Attention to the Causes of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.
  • “Biological psychology,” or “behavioral neuroscience,” now defined within the text.
  • Discussion of agonist and antagonist drugs moved to the section “Neurotransmitters: Messengers of the Network.” Agonist and antagonist effects and examples are revisited at the end of the section to reinforce the concept, with new research on antianxiety medication.
  • “Ion gates” now “ion channels.”
  • Material on neuron firing condensed.
  • Material on receptor sites condensed.
  • New: The Reflex Arc: Three Types of Neurons, afferent, efferent, and interneurons.
  • Endocrine gland section now mentions comparison between endocrine communication and synaptic communication.
  • “Clinical Studies” section now renamed “Lesioning Studies.”
  • Invasive and noninvasive techniques of brain stimulation added.
  • Methods of studying the brain are now divided between mapping structure (CT, MRI) and mapping function (EEG, PET, SPECT, fMRI).
  • SPECT now defined and discussed.
  • Mirror neurons discussion moved to frontal lobe section and expanded.
  • New: Michael Gazzaniga’s research on cerebral hemispheres.

Chapter 3:  Sensation and Perception

  • New Learning Objective 3.8: What is depth perception and what kind of cues are important for it to occur?
  • Information about James Vicary and subliminal perception condensed.
  • New content about subliminal perception studies added, as well as supraliminal stimuli.
  • “The Structure of the Eye” contains new content on light entering the eye and refraction, also PRK and LASIK content.
  • New description “Through the Eyes to the Brain” added.
  • Expanded description of Brown & Wald and Young & von Helmholtz’s studies.
  • Longer explanation of colorblindness (protanopia, deuteranopia, tritanopia).
  • Condensed material on sound waves’ journey to the brain.
  • New mention in “Taste” section about obese vs. non-obese level of perceived sweetness in foods.
  • Revised explanation of olfactory bulbs’ connection to the brain.
  • “Development of Perception” section changed to “Depth Perception.” Content on development of perception in infants removed. Classic Studies in Psychology: The Visual Cliff, on depth perception, removed.
  • Addition of the Hermann Grid in “Perceptual Illusions” section.
  • “Rotating Snakes” motion-illusion (Kitaoka) explanation and description added.
  • Levant’s “Enigma” motion-illusion added, as well as research on microsaccades eye movements.
  • New Applying Psychology to Everyday Life: Beyond “Smoke and Mirrors”—The Psychological Science and Neuroscience of Magic replaces content on ESP.

Chapter 4:  Learning

  • This chapter has been restructured so that the section on schedules of reinforcement appears after “Positive and Negative Reinforcement” and the section titled “Stimulus Control: Slow Down, It’s the Cops” appears after the discussion of how to make punishment more effective. The Learning Objectives have been reordered accordingly.
  • New chapter prologue: “Why Clowns Can Be Scary.”
  • New Learning Objective 4.7: “How does punishment differ from reinforcement?”
  • “Reflex” is now a key term.
  • A metronome—not a bell—is the conditioned stimulus in Pavlov’s classic experiment. Figures and the section titled “Putting It All Together…” have been modified to reflect this change.
  • Condensed discussion on John Watson in the section on the Little Albert experiment.
  • Removal of discussion on television public service messages designed to elicit fear.
  • Expanded discussion of biological preparedness and fear-inducing stimuli.
  • Some of the discussion of positive and negative reinforcement has been moved to the section titled The Role of Punishment in Operant Conditioning.
  • NewIssues in Psychology: The Link Between Spanking and Aggression in Young Children, which discusses recent research (Taylor et al., 2010) on spanking.
  • The section titled More Concepts in Operant Conditioning has been renamed Other Concepts in Operant Conditioning.
  • NewClassic Studies in Psychology: Biological Constraints on Operant Conditioning.
  • The section titled Applying Operant Conditioning: Behavior Modification has been renamed Using Operant Conditioning: Behavior Modification.
  • Discussion of neurofeedback simplified, now includes use of fMRIs.
  • Expanded discussion of learned helplessness, including new research on the underlying biological mechanisms.
  • Revised discussion of violent media and its effect on children, including new research.

Chapter 5: Memory

  • New chapter prologue: “Unforgettable: Brad Williams, the ‘Human Google.’”
  • Learning Objective 5.8 “How are long-term memories formed, and what kinds of problems do people experience as a result?” has been replaced with “How are long-term memories formed, and how can this process lead to inaccuracies in memory?”
  • Learning Objective for the section on Alzheimer’s disease changed to “What are the facts about Alzheimer’s disease?”
  • The section titled Memory has been renamed Three Processes of Memory. 
  • Removal of “Levels-of-Processing Model” and “Parallel Distributed Processing (PDP) Model” as separate sections.  This material has been reworked and merged, and is now presented inModels of Memory.
  • Discussion of short-term memory and the “cocktail party effect” has been expanded and includes new research.
  • The section titled “Capacity: The Magical Number Seven” has been extended to include new research on short-term memory.
  • New research on the role of adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus has been added to the discussion of short-term memory.
  • New research (Clancy et al., 2002) on susceptibility to false memories.
  • The section titled Memory and the Brain: The Physical Aspects of Memory has been renamed Neuroscience of Memory.
  • New information added on consolidation.
  • The term “engram” is no longer used in the text.
  • Expanded section on H.M., including information about his recent death and the ongoing study of his preserved brain.
  • Applying Psychology to Everyday Life: Current Research in Alzheimer’s Disease has been renamed Applying Psychology to Everyday Life: Alzheimer’s Disease. This section has also been revised and contains new research on Alzheimer’s.

Chapter 6:  Consciousness and Cognition

  • New chapter prologue, “What Do You Mean, It’s All Over?” “The Life of Albert” prologue deleted.
  • New research on animal consciousness added (Koch & Mormon, 2010).
  • New explanation of consciousness from the cognitive neuroscience perspective in the “Definition of Consciousness” section.
  • Research on texting while driving cited.
  • Added text on melatonin in “The Biology of Sleep” section.
  • New murder trial (Case Two) in Psychology in the News: Murder While Sleepwalking replaces two earlier murder cases.
  • Added material on mental rotation in “Mental Imagery” section.
  • Expanded section on visual imagery, including a discussion of research using fMRI technology to compare the brain regions activated by mental imagery to those activated by actual visual perception.
  • Table 6.2 “From Prototypes to Atypical Examples” has been revised to reflect American examples of concepts.
  • “Representative heuristic” now a key term.
  • Extended discussion of heuristics to include the “availability heuristic,” which is now a key term.
  • Removal of Psychology in the News: Artificial Intelligence.
  • In discussion of confirmation bias, new research added on multitasking while driving a motor vehicle.
  • In “Language” section, discussion of linguistic relativity expanded to include new research.
  • New Applying Psychology to Everyday Life: Mental and Physical Exercises Combine for Better Cognitive Health, replaces Applying Psychology to Everyday Life: Mental Exercises for Better Cognitive Health. New text on maintaining cognitive fitness, research on computerized brain-training programs; also new research on using computerized cognitive exercises on individuals with schizophrenia; additional material on fluid intelligence as well as studies on physical exercise and cognitive function.

Chapter 7:  Development Across the Life Span

  • New chapter prologue: “Not Your Average 16-Year-Olds.”
  • New Current Issues in Psychology: The Big Lie: Dr. Andrew Wakefield and the Vaccine Scandal replaces Current Issues in Psychology: The Facts and Myths about Immunizations.
  • New Applying Psychology to Everyday Life: Cross-Cultural Views on Death replaces Applying Psychology to Everyday Life: ADHD—Not Just for Children. Learning Objective 7.12 has been modified accordingly.
  • The material on genetics now appears in its own section titled: The Basic Building Blocks of Development. Prenatal Development follows this section.
  • “The Zygote and Twinning” now titled “Fertilization, the Zygote and Twinning.”
  • New research on Autism Spectrum Disorder added.
  • New research on positive emotions and memory (Addis et al., 2010).
  • “Ego integrity” is now a key term. It replaces the term “integrity.”
  • Activity theory in aging added.

Chapter 8: Motivation and Emotion

  • New chapter prologue: “Making the Grade.”
  • New Issues in Psychology: What Is the Evolutionary Purpose of Homosexuality? Examines the “kin selection hypothesis.”
  • New Applying Psychology to Everyday Life: When Motivation Is Not Enough replaces Applying Psychology to Everyday Life: A How-To of Happiness.
  • Discussion of intrinsic approaches to motivation extended to include research on heredity.
  • The section on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs has undergone revision:
    • Castaway example no longer appears in the main text
    • Condensed discussion of Maslow’s influence on management
    • New discussion of Douglas Kenrick’s revised theory
    • Deleted Lincoln and Poe material
  • Removal of LeVay’s study on hypothalamus and sexual orientation.
  • New research on biological findings related to sexual orientation.
  • New discussion of Joseph LeDoux’s research on the amygdala.
  • New research (J.S. Beer, 2009) on the neuroanatomy of emotional control 

Chapter 9:   Stress and Health

  • New chapter prologue: “Laughter: The Best Medicine?”
  • New Issues in Psychology: Health Psychology and Stress.
  • New Applying Psychology to Everyday Life: Exercising for Mental Health, replaces content on ways to promote wellness.
  • New Learning Objective 9.8: What are some problems in eating behavior, and how are they affected by biology and culture?  Replaces How can eating become a disorder?
  • New research on the effects of the September 11, 2011, attacks and Hurricane Katrina in the section of environmental stressors.
  • New research on PTSD and military personnel.
  • New research on uncontrollability and stress described in the section on psychological factors in stress.
  • New research (Morgan et al., 2009) on the hormone DHEA has been added to the section on the immune system and stress.
  • New section “Diabetes” has been added:
    • “Type 2 diabetes” now a key term
    • New research on the link between diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and mental decline
    • New research (Mroczek et al., 2009) linking personality with health.
  • “Glucagon” now a key term.
  • “Bulimia nervosa” now a key term.
  • Bulimia Nervosa section condensed, with new citations.

Chapter 10:  Social Psychology 

  • New chapter prologue: “The Michelangelo Phenomenon: Sculpting Your Partner.”
  • New Psychology in the News: Facing Facebook—The Social Nature of Online Networking.
  • The section on the Kitty Genovese murder has undergone revision:
  • Extended description of the murder
  • Comparison to the 2007 murder of LaShanda Calloway
  • Inclusion of new evidence about the case.
  • New research on violence in television and video.

Chapter 11:  Theories of Personality and Intelligence

  • Subtitle of section “Individual Differences in Intelligence: Intellectual Disability and Giftedness” replaces “Mental Retardation and Giftedness.”
  • New Applying Psychology to Everyday Life: The Biological Basis of the Big Five, replaces content on online personality tests.
  • Expanded discussion of the history of personality theory.
  • “Anal expulsive personality,” “anal retentive personality,” and “identification” are no longer key terms.
  • Discussion of the Five-Factor Model in the context of the DSM-5 and the effort to develop dimensional approaches to diagnosing psychological disorders.
  • New research (Kagan, 2010) on possible subjectivity and cultural bias has been added to the discussion about the problems with personality inventories.
  • New material on Stanford-Binet 5 test.
  • New material on Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale.
  • Added text on ecological validity.
  • “Intellectual disability” now a key term, replacing “mental retardation.”
  • Condensed information on diagnosing intellectual disability.
  • New research on genetic factors in twins.
  • Heritability material condensed.

Chapter 12:  Psychological Disorders

  • This chapter has been substantially restructured:
    • The section on mood disorders appears after anxiety disorders
    • Eating disorders are now covered in this chapter
    • Learning Objectives have been revised.
  • New chapter prologue: “The Psychological Impact of Disasters.”
  • Discussion of postpartum psychosis removed from chapter.
  • New Issues in Psychology: Abnormality Versus Insanity.
  • New Applying Psychology to Everyday Life:Taking the Worry Out of Exams added.
  • The section “A Brief History of Mental Illness” is now titled “A Very Brief History of Psychological Disorders.”
  • “Multifaceted Definition of Abnormality” is now “The Sociocultural Perspective.”
  • Removal of “Current Issues in Psychology: A Look at Abnormality in Various Cultures.” This material has been moved into the new section “The Sociocultural Perspective.”
  • New research (Mejía & McCarthy, 2010) on anxiety and depression in college students of Mexican heritage in the section on the sociocultural perspective.
  • The section “A Final Definition of Abnormality” is now titled “A Working Definition of Abnormality.”
  • Updated NIMH statistics on the rate of psychological disorders in the United States in the section “What are the different types of psychological disorders and how common are they?” and the associated table.
  • New section “The Pros and Cons of Labels,” which discusses, among other things, the famous Rosenhan experiment.
  • Condensed section on OCD.
  • Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are now discussed and defined in the section on anxiety disorders.
  • New research (Adhikari et al., 2010) on the role of the ventral hippocampus in controlling anxiety.
  • Condensed discussion of less severe mood disorders.
  • “Dysthymia” and “cyclothymia” are no longer key terms.
  • Changes to the section “Causes of Mood Disorders”:
    • New material comparing symptoms of bipolar disorder and ADHD in children
    • Psychodynamic explanation for depression removed
    • New research (Strunk et al., 2010) on cognitive therapy
    • New discussion of seasonal affective disorder
  • John Nash is no longer discussed in the main text on schizophrenia.
  • Extended discussion of the causes of schizophrenia:
    • Additional biological explanations, including inflammation
    • Discussion of several new research findings
    • Discussion of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI).
  • Psychodynamic explanation removed from the section on the causes of personality disorders.
  • The elevated risk of schizophrenia in relatives of schizotypal personality disorder is no longer discussed in the section on the causes of personality disorders.
  • New Section “Future Directions in Psychopathology” on the DSM-5.

Chapter 13:  Psychological Therapies

  • New prologue on the use of cingulotomies to treat OCD.
  • New Psychology in the News: Mental Health on Campus replaces content on EMDR.
  • New Applying Psychology to Everyday Life: Virtual Realities replaces content on antidepressants for children.
  • New Learning Objective 13.10 “How might computers be used in psychotherapy?” replaces objective about children and antidepressants.
  • Extended discussion of psychotherapy and biomedical therapy and new research on the effectiveness of combining the two.
  • The section In the Beginning: Psychoanalysis has been renamed Psychotherapy Begins.
  • “Resistance” and “Transference” have been combined into one section.
  • Evaluation of Psychoanalysis section now titled Evaluation of Psychoanalysis and Psychodynamic Approaches.
  • New section on Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) after the section on evaluating psychoanalysis.
  • New section on motivational interviewing in the section on person-centered therapy.
  • Condensed description of gestalt therapy.
  • Condensed section on aversion therapy. Disulfiram (Antabuse) no longer discussed.
  • New section on exposure therapies. Content on flooding and EMDR moved to this section.
  • Condensed section on contingency contracting.
  • Condensed section on rational-emotive behavioral therapy.
  • Family counseling section condensed.
  • New advantage to group therapy listed: “An extremely shy person may initially have great difficulty speaking up in a group setting but cognitive-behavioral group therapy can be effective for social phobia (Heimberg & Becker, 2002; Turk et al., 2008).”
  • An extremely shy person may have great difficulty…” has been removed from the list of disadvantages to group therapy.
  • Condensed description of Hans Eysenck study on the effectiveness of psychotherapy.
  • Extended section on the characteristics of effective therapy:
    • New terms/concepts introduced: common factors approach, opportunity for catharsis, learning and practice of new behaviors, and positive experiences
    • New discussion of evidence-based practice, including new research on which therapies are most effective for a variety of disorders
  • The barriers to psychotherapy with cultural or ethnic differences between client and therapist have been updated:
    • “Culture values” are now referred to as “culture-bound values”
    • “Social class” is now referred to as “class-bound values”
    • Expanded descriptions.
  • New section on cybertherapy.
  • Removal of “bilateral ECT” and “unilateral ECT” as key terms. Discussion of this topic has been removed from the section on ECT.
  • New “Emerging Techniques” section, which discusses additional invasive and noninvasive procedures and new research.

Table of Contents

1. BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Chapter 1  The Science of Psychology

Chapter 2  The Biological Perspective

Chapter 3  Sensation and Perception

Chapter 4  Learning

Chapter 5  Memory

Chapter 6  Consciousness and Cognition

Chapter 7  Development Across the Life Span

Chapter 8  Motivation and Emotion

Chapter 9  Stress and Health

Chapter 10  Social Psychology

Chapter 11  Theories of Personality and Intelligence

Chapter 12  Psychological Disorders

Chapter 13  Psychological Therapies