DevOps: A Software Architect's Perspective

Series
Addison-Wesley
Author
Len Bass / Ingo Weber / Liming Zhu  
Publisher
Addison-Wesley
Cover
Softcover
Edition
1
Language
English
Total pages
352
Pub.-date
May 2015
ISBN13
9780134049847
ISBN
0134049845
Related Titles


Product detail

Product Price CHF Available  
9780134049847
DevOps: A Software Architect's Perspective
45.10 approx. 7-9 days

Description

This book provides a conceptual discussion of DevOps practices and their implications on system design. It covers team practices related to DevOps, build and test, deployment, and post deployment. This is the only book that deals with the system implications of DevOps. It includes case studies, references, practical examples and checklists for architects.

Features

  • Teaches students to:
  • Deploy DevOps more efficiently, avoid problems, and drive far more value
  • Design systems to be compatible with DevOps practices
  • Understand the tradeoffs implicit in using each key DevOps practice
  • Integrate DevOps with agile methods

Table of Contents

Preface xi

Previewing the Book xiii

Acknowledgments xv

Legend xvii

 

Part I: Background 1

 

Chapter 1: What Is DevOps? 3

1.1 Introduction 3

1.2 Why DevOps? 7

1.3 DevOps Perspective 11

1.4 DevOps and Agile 12

1.5 Team Structure 13

1.6 Coordination 17

1.7 Barriers 20

1.8 Summary 23

1.9 For Further Reading 24

 

Chapter 2: The Cloud as a Platform 27

2.1 Introduction 27

2.2 Features of the Cloud 29

2.3 DevOps Consequences of the Unique Cloud Features 41

2.4 Summary 44

2.5 For Further Reading 45

 

Chapter 3: Operations 47

3.1 Introduction 47

3.2 Operations Services 47

3.3 Service Operation Functions 57

3.4 Continual Service Improvement 58

3.5 Operations and DevOps 59

3.6 Summary 61

3.7 For Further Reading 61

 

Part II: The Deployment Pipeline 63

 

Chapter 4: Overall Architecture 65

4.1 Do DevOps Practices Require Architectural Change? 65

4.2 Overall Architecture Structure 66

4.3 Quality Discussion of Microservice Architecture 72

4.4 Amazon’s Rules for Teams 75

4.5 Microservice Adoption for Existing Systems 76

4.6 Summary 77

4.7 For Further Reading 78

 

Chapter 5: Building and Testing 79

5.1 Introduction 79

5.2 Moving a System Through the Deployment Pipeline 81

5.3 Crosscutting Aspects 84

5.4 Development and Pre-commit Testing 86

5.5 Build and Integration Testing 91

5.6 UAT/Staging/Performance Testing 95

5.7 Production 96

5.8 Incidents 98

5.9 Summary 98

5.10 For Further Reading 99

 

Chapter 6: Deployment 101

6.1 Introduction 101

6.2 Strategies for Managing a Deployment 102

6.3 Logical Consistency 105

6.4 Packaging 111

6.5 Deploying to Multiple Environments 114

6.6 Partial Deployment 117

6.7 Rollback 118

6.8 Tools 121

6.9 Summary 121

6.10 For Further Reading 122

 

Part III: Crosscutting Concerns 125

 

Chapter 7: Monitoring 127

7.1 Introduction 127

7.2 What to Monitor 129

7.3 How to Monitor 134

7.4 When to Change the Monitoring Configuration 139

7.5 Interpreting Monitoring Data 139

7.6 Challenges 143

7.7 Tools 147

7.8 Diagnosing an Anomaly from Monitoring Data–the Case of Platformer.com 148

7.9 Summary 152

7.10 For Further Reading 153

 

Chapter 8: Security and Security Audits 155

8.1 What Is Security? 156

8.2 Threats 157

8.3 Resources to Be Protected 159

8.4 Security Roles and Activities 162

8.5 Identity Management 165

8.6 Access Control 169

8.7 Detection, Auditing, and Denial of Service 172

8.8 Development 173

8.9 Auditors 174

8.10 Application Design Considerations 175

8.11 Deployment Pipeline Design Considerations 176

8.12 Summary 177

8.13 For Further Reading 178

 

Chapter 9: Other Ilities 181

9.1 Introduction 181

9.2 Repeatability 183

9.3 Performance 186

9.4 Reliability 188

9.5 Recoverability 190

9.6 Interoperability 191

9.7 Testability 192

9.8 Modifiability 194

9.9 Summary 195

9.10 For Further Reading 196

 

Chapter 10: Business Considerations 197

10.1 Introduction 197

10.2 Business Case 197

10.3 Measurements and Compliance to DevOps Practices 206

10.4 Points of Interaction Between Dev and Ops 209

10.5 Summary 211

10.6 For Further Reading 211

 

Part IV: Case Studies 213

 

Chapter 11: Supporting Multiple Datacenters 215

11.1 Introduction 215

11.2 Current State 216

11.3 Business Logic and Web Tiers 216

11.4 Database Tier 220

11.5 Other Infrastructure Tools 223

11.6 Datacenter Switch 225

11.7 Testing 232

11.8 Summary 233

11.9 For Further Reading 234

 

Chapter 12: Implementing a Continuous Deployment Pipeline for Enterprises 237

12.1 Introduction 237

12.2 Organizational Context 238

12.3 The Continuous Deployment Pipeline 240

12.4 Baking Security into the Foundations of the CD Pipeline 257

12.5 Advanced Concepts 259

12.6 Summary 261

12.7 For Further Reading 262

 

Chapter 13: Migrating to Microservices 263

13.1 Introduction to Atlassian 263

13.2 Building a Platform for Deploying Microservices 265

13.3 BlobStore: A Microservice Example 268

13.4 Development Process 273

13.5 Evolving BlobStore 279

13.6 Summary 284

13.7 For Further Reading 284

 

Part V: Moving into the Future 285

 

Chapter 14: Operations as a Process 287

14.1 Introduction 287

14.2 Motivation and Overview 288

14.3 Offline Activities 289

14.4 Online Activities 294

14.5 Error Diagnosis 296

14.6 Monitoring 296

14.7 Summary 298

14.8 For Further Reading 298

 

Chapter 15: The Future of DevOps 299

15.1 Introduction 299

15.2 Organizational Issues 300

15.3 Process Issues 302

15.4 Technology Issues 305

15.5 What About Error Reporting and Repair? 309

15.6 Final Words 310

15.7 For Further Reading 310

 

References 311

About the Authors 315

Index 317

Author

Len Bass is a senior principal researcher at National ICT Australia Ltd. (NICTA). He joined NICTA in 2011 after 25 years at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) at Carnegie Mellon University. He is the coauthor of two award-winning books in software architecture—Software Architecture in Practice, Third Edition (Addison-Wesley 2013) and Documenting Software Architectures: Views and Beyond, Second Edition (Addison-Wesley 2011)—as well as several other books and numerous papers in computer science and software engineering on a wide range of topics. Len has more than 50 years’ experience in software development and research, which has resulted in papers on operating systems, database man­agement systems, user interface software, software architecture, product line sys­tems, and computer operations. He has worked or consulted in multiple domains, including scientific analysis, embedded systems, and information and financial systems.

 

Ingo Weber is a senior researcher in the Software Systems Research Group at NICTA in Sydney, Australia, as well as an adjunct senior lecturer at CSE at the University of New South Wales (UNSW). Prior to NICTA, Ingo held posi­tions at UNSW and at SAP Research Karlsruhe, Germany. His research interests include cloud computing, DevOps, business process management, and artificial intelligence (AI). He has published over 60 peer-reviewed papers, and served as a reviewer or program committee member for many prestigious scientific jour­nals and conferences. Ingo holds a Ph.D. and a Diploma from the University of Karlsruhe, and an MSc from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

 

Liming Zhu is a research group leader and principal researcher at NICTA. He holds conjoint positions at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) and the University of Sydney. Liming has published over 80 peer-reviewed papers. He formerly worked in several technology lead positions in the software industry before obtaining a Ph.D. in software engineering from UNSW. He is a committee member of the Standards Australia IT-015 (system and software engineering), contributing to ISO/SC7. Liming’s research interests include software architec­ture and dependable systems.