Concurrent Programming on Windows

Series
Addison-Wesley
Author
Joe Duffy / Herb Sutter  
Publisher
Addison-Wesley
Cover
Softcover
Edition
1
Language
English
Total pages
1008
Pub.-date
October 2008
ISBN13
9780321434821
ISBN
032143482X


Product detail

Product Price CHF Available  
9780321434821
Concurrent Programming on Windows
72.00 approx. 7-9 days

Description

“When you begin using multi-threading throughout an application, the importance of clean architecture and design is critical. . . . This places an emphasis on understanding not only the platform's capabilities but also emerging best practices. Joe does a great job interspersing best practices alongside theory throughout his book.”

- From the Foreword by Craig Mundie, Chief Research and Strategy Officer, Microsoft Corporation

 

Author Joe Duffy has risen to the challenge of explaining how to write software that takes full advantage of concurrency and hardware parallelism. In Concurrent Programming on Windows, he explains how to design, implement, and maintain large-scale concurrent programs, primarily using C# and C++ for Windows.

 

Duffy aims to give application, system, and library developers the tools and techniques needed to write efficient, safe code for multicore processors. This is important not only for the kinds of problems where concurrency is inherent and easily exploitable-such as server applications, compute-intensive image manipulation, financial analysis, simulations, and AI algorithms-but also for problems that can be speeded up using parallelism but require more effort-such as math libraries, sort routines, report generation, XML manipulation, and stream processing algorithms.

 

Concurrent Programming on Windows has four major sections: The first introduces concurrency at a high level, followed by a section that focuses on the fundamental platform features, inner workings, and API details. Next, there is a section that describes common patterns, best practices, algorithms, and data structures that emerge while writing concurrent software. The final section covers many of the common system-wide architectural and process concerns of concurrent programming.

 

This is the only book you'll need in order to learn the best practices and common patterns for programming with concurrency on Windows and .NET.

Table of Contents

Foreword xix

Preface xxiii

Acknowledgments xxvii

About the Author xxix

 

Part I: Concepts 1

 

Chapter 1: Introduction 3

Why Concurrency? 3

Program Architecture and Concurrency 6

Layers of Parallelism 8

Why Not Concurrency? 10

Where Are We? 11

 

Chapter 2: Synchronization and Time 13

Managing Program State 14

Synchronization: Kinds and Techniques 38

Where Are We? 73

 

Part II: Mechanisms 77

 

Chapter 3: Threads 79

Threading from 10,001 Feet 80

The Life and Death of Threads 89

Where Are We? 124

 

Chapter 4: Advanced Threads 127

Thread State 127

Inside Thread Creation and Termination 152

Thread Scheduling 154

Where Are We? 180

 

Chapter 5: Windows Kernel Synchronization 183

The Basics: Signaling and Waiting 184

Using the Kernel Objects 211

Where Are We? 251

 

Chapter 6: Data and Control Synchronization 253

Mutual Exclusion 255

Reader/Writer Locks (RWLs) 287

Condition Variables 304

Where Are We? 312

 

Chapter 7: Thread Pools 315

Thread Pools 101 316

Windows Thread Pools 323

CLR Thread Pool 364

Performance When Using the Thread Pools 391

Where Are We? 398

 

Chapter 8: Asynchronous Programming Models 399

Asynchronous Programming Model (APM) 400

Event-Based Asynchronous Pattern 421

Where Are We? 427

 

Chapter 9: Fibers 429

An Overview of Fibers 430

Using Fibers 435

Additional Fiber-Related Topics 445

Building a User-Mode Scheduler 453

Where Are We? 473

 

Part III: Techniques 475

 

Chapter 10: Memory Models and Lock Freedom 477

Memory Load and Store Reordering 478

Hardware Atomicity 486

Memory Consistency Models 506

Examples of Low-Lock Code 520

Where Are We? 541

 

Chapter 11: Concurrency Hazards 545

Correctness Hazards 546

Liveness Hazards 572

Where Are We? 609

 

Chapter 12: Parallel Containers 613

Fine-Grained Locking 616

Lock Free 632

Coordination Containers 640

Where Are We? 654

 

Chapter 13: Data and Task Parallelism 657

Data Parallelism 659

Task Parallelism 684

Message-Based Parallelism 719

Cross-Cutting Concerns 720

Where Are We? 732

 

Chapter 14: Performance and Scalability 735

Parallel Hardware Architecture 736

Speedup: Parallel vs. Sequential Code 756

Spin Waiting 767

Where Are We? 781

 

Part IV: Systems 783

 

Chapter 15: Input and Output 785

Overlapped I/O 786

I/O Cancellation 822

Where Are We? 826

 

Chapter 16: Graphical User Interfaces 829

GUI Threading Models 830

.NET Asynchronous GUI Features 837

Where Are We? 860

 

Part V: Appendices 863

 

Appendix A: Designing Reusable Libraries for Concurrent .NET Programs 865

The 20,000-Foot View 866

The Details 867

 

Appendix B: Parallel Extensions to .NET 887

Task Parallel Library 888

Parallel LINQ 910

Synchronization Primitives 915

Concurrent Collections 924

 

Index 931

Back Cover

“When you begin using multi-threading throughout an application, the importance of clean architecture and design is critical. . . . This places an emphasis on understanding not only the platform's capabilities but also emerging best practices. Joe does a great job interspersing best practices alongside theory throughout his book.”

- From the Foreword by Craig Mundie, Chief Research and Strategy Officer, Microsoft Corporation

 

Author Joe Duffy has risen to the challenge of explaining how to write software that takes full advantage of concurrency and hardware parallelism. In Concurrent Programming on Windows, he explains how to design, implement, and maintain large-scale concurrent programs, primarily using C# and C++ for Windows.

 

Duffy aims to give application, system, and library developers the tools and techniques needed to write efficient, safe code for multicore processors. This is important not only for the kinds of problems where concurrency is inherent and easily exploitable-such as server applications, compute-intensive image manipulation, financial analysis, simulations, and AI algorithms-but also for problems that can be speeded up using parallelism but require more effort-such as math libraries, sort routines, report generation, XML manipulation, and stream processing algorithms.

 

Concurrent Programming on Windows has four major sections: The first introduces concurrency at a high level, followed by a section that focuses on the fundamental platform features, inner workings, and API details. Next, there is a section that describes common patterns, best practices, algorithms, and data structures that emerge while writing concurrent software. The final section covers many of the common system-wide architectural and process concerns of concurrent programming.

 

This is the only book you'll need in order to learn the best practices and common patterns for programming with concurrency on Windows and .NET.

Author

Joe Duffy is the development lead, architect, and founder of the Parallel Extensions to the .NET Framework team at Microsoft. In addition to hacking code and managing a team of developers, he works on long-term vision and incubation efforts, such as language and type system support for concurrency safety. He previously worked on the Common Language Runtime team. Joe blogs regularly at www.bluebytesoftware.com/blog.

Reader Review(s)

“I have been fascinated with concurrency ever since I added threading support to the Common Language Runtime a decade ago. That's also where I met Joe, who is a world expert on this topic. These days, concurrency is a first-order concern for practically all developers. Thank goodness for Joe's book. It is a tour de force and I shall rely on it for many years to come.”

-Chris Brumme, Distinguished Engineer, Microsoft

 

“I first met Joe when we were both working with the Microsoft CLR team. At that time, we had several discussions about threading and it was apparent that he was as passionate about this subject as I was. Later, Joe transitioned to Microsoft's Parallel Computing Platform team where a lot of his good ideas about threading could come to fruition. Most threading and concurrency books that I have come across contain information that is incorrect and explains how to solve contrived problems that good architecture would never get you into in the first place. Joe's book is one of the very few books that I respect on the matter, and this respect comes from knowing Joe's knowledge, experience, and his ability to explain concepts.”

-Jeffrey Richter, Wintellect

 

“There are few areas in computing that are as important, or shrouded in mystery, as concurrency. It's not simple, and Duffy doesn't claim to make it so-but armed with the right information and excellent advice, creating correct and highly scalable systems is at least possible. Every self-respecting Windows developer should read this book.”

-Jonathan Skeet, Software Engineer, Clearswift

 

“What I love about this book is that it is both comprehensive in its coverage of concurrency on the Windows platform, as well as very practical in its presentation of techniques immediately applicable to real-world software development. Joe's book is a 'must have' resource for anyone building native or managed code Windows applications that leverage concurrency!”

-Steve Teixeira, Product Unit Manager, Parallel Computing Platform, Microsoft Corporation

 

“This book is a fabulous compendium of both theoretical knowledge and practical guidance on writing effective concurrent applications. Joe Duffy is not only a preeminent expert in the art of developing parallel applications for Windows, he's also a true student of the art of writing. For this book, he has combined those two skill sets to create what deserves and is destined to be a long-standing classic in developers' hands everywhere.”

-Stephen Toub, Program Manager Lead, Parallel Computing Platform, Microsoft

 

“As chip designers run out of ways to make the individual chip faster, they have moved towards adding parallel compute capacity instead. Consumer PCs with multiple cores are now commonplace. We are at an inflection point where improved performance will no longer come from faster chips but rather from our ability as software developers to exploit concurrency. Understanding the concepts of concurrent programming and how to write concurrent code has therefore become a crucial part of writing successful software. With Concurrent Programming on Windows, Joe Duffy has done a great job explaining concurrent concepts from the fundamentals through advanced techniques. The detailed descriptions of algorithms and their interaction with the underlying hardware turn a complicated subject into something very approachable. This book is the perfect companion to have at your side while writing concurrent software for Windows.”

-Jason Zander, General Manager, Visual Studio, Microsoft